List of brightest stars

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Below are the 50 brightest individual stars in order of their average apparent magnitudes in the visible spectrum as seen from Earth.

To the naked eye on a clear dark night, in a place far from cities and lights, the total number of stars visible is about 9000. This is not the same as a list of the brightest stars as seen with the naked eye, because close binary or multiple star systems will appear as a single star brighter than their individual components. The binary system Rigel Kentaurus has an apparent magnitude of -0.27, but the brightest individual star is Alpha Centauri A with the apparent magnitude as listed here of -0.01. Hence Alpha Centauri is the third brightest star in the night sky, whilst its brightest component Alpha Centauri A is the fourth brightest individual star.[1]

  V Mag.
(m)
Bayer designation Proper name Distance (ly) Spectral class SIMBAD
0 0.000−26.74   (Sun) 0.000 016 G2 V
1 0.001−1.46 α CMa Sirius 0008.6 A1 V Sirius A
2 0.003−0.72 α Car Canopus 0310 F0 Ia Canopus
3 0.004−0.27 α Cen AB (α1 Cen) Rigil Kent, Toliman 0004.4 G2 V/K1 V Alpha Centauri A
4 0.003−0.04 var α Boo Arcturus 0037 K1.5 III Arcturus
5 0.03 α Lyr Vega 0025 A0 V Vega
6 0.08 α Aur Capella 0042 G8 III, G1 III Capella A
7 0.12 β Ori Rigel 0860 B8 Iab Rigel
8 0.34 α CMi Procyon 0011 F5 IV-V Procyon
9 0.42 var α Ori Betelgeuse 0640 [2] M2 Iab Betelgeuse
10 0.50 α Eri Achernar 0140 B3 Vpe Achernar
11 0.60 β Cen Hadar, Agena 0350 B1 III Hadar (Agena)
12 0.77 α Aql Altair 0017 A7 V Altair
13 0.77 α Cru Acrux 0320 B1 V Acrux A
14 0.85 var α Tau Aldebaran 0065 K5 III Aldebaran
15 0.96 α2 Aur Capella B 0042 G1 III Capella B
16 1.04 α Vir Spica 0260 B1 III-IV, B2 V Spica
17 1.09 var α Sco Antares 0600 M1.5 Iab-b Antares
18 1.15 β Gem Pollux 0034 K0 IIIb Pollux
19 1.16 α PsA Fomalhaut 0025 A3 V Fomalhaut
20 1.25 α Cyg Deneb 1,550 A2 Ia Deneb
21 1.30 β Cru Mimosa, Becrux 0350 B0.5 IV Mimosa
22 1.35 α Leo Regulus 0077 B7 V Regulus
23 1.51 ε CMa Adara 0430 B2 Iab Adara
24 1.58 α Gem Castor 0052 A1 V, A2 Vm Castor
25 1.62 λ Sco Shaula 0700 B1.5-2 IV+ Shaula
26 1.63 γ Cru Gacrux 0088 M4III Gacrux
27 1.64 γ Ori Bellatrix 0240 B2 III Bellatrix
28 1.68 β Tau El Nath 0130 B7 III El Nath
29 1.68 β Car Miaplacidus 0110 A2 IV Miaplacidus
30 1.70 ε Ori Alnilam 1,300 B0 Iab Alnilam
31 1.70 ζ Ori A Alnitak 0820 O9 Iab Alnitak A
32 1.74 α Gru Alnair 0100 B7 IV Al Na'ir
33 1.76 ε UMa Alioth 0081 A0pCr Alioth
34 1.78 γ2 Vel Suhail, Regor 0840 WC8 + O7.5e Gamma2 Velorum
35 1.79 α UMa Dubhe 0120 K0 III, F0 V Dubhe
36 1.80 ε Sgr Kaus Australis 0140 B9.5 III Kaus Australis
37 1.82 α Per Mirfak 0590 F5 Ib Mirfak
38 1.84 δ CMa Wezen 1,800 F8 Ia Wezen
39 1.85 η UMa Benetnasch, Alkaid 0100 B3 V Benetnasch (Alkaid)
40 1.86 θ Sco Sargas 0270 F1 II Sargas
41 1.86 ε Car Avior 0630 K3 III, B2 Vp Avior
42 1.90 γ Gem Alhena 0100 A0 IV Alhena
43 1.91 α Pav Peacock 0180 B2 IV Peacock
44 1.92 α TrA Atria 0420 K2 IIb-IIIa Atria
45 1.96 δ Vel Koo She 0080 A1 V, F2-F5 Delta Velorum
46 1.97 var α UMi Polaris 0430 F7 Ib-II Polaris
47 1.98 β CMa Mirzam 0500 B1 II-III Murzim
48 1.98 α Hya Alphard 0180 K3 II-III Alphard
49 2.00 α Ari Hamal 0066 K2IIICa-1 Hamal
50 2.01 γ1 Leo Algieba 0130 K0 IIIb, G7 IIICN Algieba

References[change | change source]

  1. [1]
  2. Graham M. Harper, Alexander Brown, and Edward F. Guinan, (2008, April). "A New VLA-Hipparcos Distance to Betelgeuse and its Implications" (PDF). The Astronomical Journal (IOP Publishing) 135 (4,): pp. 1430–1440. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/135/4/1430 . http://iopscience.iop.org/1538-3881/135/4/1430/pdf/aj_135_4_1430.pdf. Retrieved 2010-07-10.