Loch Ness

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Loch Ness with Urquhart Castle in the foreground

Loch Ness is a loch in the Scottish Highlands. It is also on the Great Glen Fault and part of the Caledonian Canal.

Loch Ness is 36 kilometres long and only 1.5 kilometres wide. It is the second largest Scottish loch by surface area at 56.4 km2 (21.8 sq mi), after Loch Lomond. Because of its great depth, it is the largest by volume. Its deepest point is 230 m (755 ft).[1][2] This is deeper than any other loch except Loch Morar.

It contains more fresh water than all the lakes in England and Wales combined,[2] and is the largest body of water on the Great Glen Fault, which runs from Inverness in the north to Fort William in the south.

In popular legend, it is the home of the "Loch Ness Monster", a myth which was promoted by a faked photograph.

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