Met Office

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Met Office
Agency overview
Formed 1854
Jurisdiction United Kingdom
Headquarters Exeter
Agency executive John Hirst
Parent agency Ministry of Defence
Website
www.MetOffice.gov.uk

The Met Office (now the official name for the Meteorological Office) is the United Kingdom's national weather service.

More than 50% of its revenue comes from goods and services. This is why it is a 'trading fund' of the Ministry of Defence.

Part of the Met Office headquarters at Exeter in Devon is the Met Office College. This does the training for internal personnel and many forecasters from around the world.

Forecasts[change | edit source]

Shipping Forecast[change | edit source]

One of the British stalwarts, the Shipping Forecast, is produced by the Met Office and broadcast on BBC Radio 4. The Shipping Forecast has long been vital to the safety of mariners on the seas around the British Isles.

Weather forecasting and warnings[change | edit source]

The Met Office is responsible for issuing Severe Weather Warnings for the United Kingdom through the National Severe Weather Warning Service (NSWWS). These warn of weather which may affect transport and lives. In March 2008, the system was improved and a new stage of warning was introduced, the 'Advisory'.[1]

Weather prediction models[change | edit source]

Its main role is to produce forecast models. It gathers information from weather satellites in space and observations on earth. The information is fed into two IBM supercomputers. The computers use models based on a software package known as the Unified Model. The principal weather products for UK customers are 36-hour forecasts from the newly operational 1.5 km resolution UKV model covering the UK and surroundings (replacing the 4 km model); 48-hour forecasts from the 12 km resolution NAE model covering Europe and the North Atlantic; and 144-hour forecasts from the 25 km resolution global model (replacing the 40 km global model)[2]. A wide range of other products for other regions of the globe are sold to customers abroad. They are used by MOD operations abroad or provided free to developing countries in Africa. If necessary, forecasters may make adjustments to the computer forecasts.

Other pages[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]