Nurse

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Nursing links here. For feeding babies mother's milk, see breastfeeding.
A nurse working at a hospital.

A nurse is a person who is trained to give care (help) to people who are sick or injured. Nurses work with doctors and other health care workers to make patients well (not sick) and to keep them healthy. Nurses also help with end-of-life needs and assist other family members with grieving.

Nursing is a profession, like a doctor, but training for a nurse is different in how long a person must train and what kind of training they need. In some places, nurses may train for three to five years or more before they get a license as a nurse.

Nurses work in many places. Nurses work in hospitals, in doctor's offices, and in the community, and they even visit people at home.

Sometimes people decide to become nurses rather than doctors, because the nurses will be able to help patients directly, by talking to them, doing things they need, carefully watching that nothing goes wrong, and then seeing them as they get better.

Like doctors, nurses can specialize in what work they do. Some nurses train and work to help during surgery. Some nurses train to help people understand health problems like nutrition (what to eat), and disease (what can make people sick). Nurses can do many different jobs to help people.

Nurses are in demand because there are not enough nurses to handle hospital needs. Because of this shortage nurses will sometimes travel to another location to work for a few months in what is called travel nursing.

Nursing in Australia[change | change source]

Nursing in Australia is done by Registered Nurses or Enrolled Nurses. Both must complete education past high school. An Enrolled Nurse must complete a course of study between 12 and 18 months. Registered Nurses need to complete a Bachelor Degree

Other websites[change | change source]