Rheumatoid arthritis

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Rheumatoid arthritis is a severe and chronic condition that attacks flexible joints in the human body. The process is an inflammatory response of the capsule around joints, excess synovial fluid and the development of fibrous tissue in the synovium area. The pathology of this disease often leads to destruction of articular cartilage. The cause of this condition is not known, although autoimmunity plays a pivotal role in progression and chronicity. Women are three times more likely than men to be victims of rheumatoid arthritis. This condition was first recognized around 1800 by Dr. Augustin Jacob Landré-Beauvais.[1]

References[change | edit source]

  1. Landré-Beauvais AJ (1800). La goutte asthénique primitive (doctoral thesis). Paris. reproduced in Landré-Beauvais AJ (2001). "The first description of rheumatoid arthritis. Unabridged text of the doctoral dissertation presented in 1800". Joint Bone spine 68 (2): 130–43. doi:10.1016/S1297-319X(00)00247-5. PMID 11324929.