Telepathy

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An experiment which takes away someone's senses to demonstrate telepathy.

Telepathy, taken from the Greek τηλε, tele meaning "distant" and πάθεια, patheia meaning "to be affected by",[1] is the ability that is believed to allow people to speak to other people through thought, instead of through the known senses.[2] The term was coined by classics scholar and psychologist Frederic William Henry Myers in 1882.[3]Sigmund Freud did experiments with his daughter Anna where he attempted to communicate with her telepathically.[4] In 1930 Upton Sinclair wrote a book about his experiments with his wife in telepathic communication entitled Mental Radio.[5] Professor Hans Eysenck of London University's Institute of Psychiatry stated "Unless there is a gigantic conspiracy involving some thirty university departments all over the world, and several hundred highly respected scientists in various fields, many of them originally skeptical to the claims of the psychical researchers, the only conclusion that the unbiased observer can come to is that there does exist a small number of people who obtain knowledge existing in other people's minds, or in the outer world, by means as yet unknown to science".[6]

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  1. Following the model of sympathy and empathy.
  2. 2004The American Heritage College Dictionary: Fourth Edition Houghton Mifflin Company page 1417
  3. Tart, Charles T. ; Huston Smith; Kendra Smith 2009 The End of Materialism: How Evidence of the Paranormal is Bringing Science and Spirit Together Raincoast Books Oakland CA page 99
  4. Gay, Peter 1988 Freud: A Life for Our Time WW Norton and Company New York New York page 445
  5. Peters, John Durham Speaking into the Air: A History of the Idea of Communication The University of Chicago Press 1999 page 107
  6. Milton, Richard Alternative Science: Challenging the Myths of the Scientific Establishment Park Street Press Rochester, Vermont 1996 page 53