Y chromosome

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The Y chromosome is a chromosome that decides the sex in most mammals, including humans. It contains the gene SRY, which triggers testis development, so making an animal male or female.

Normal females have two X chromosomes, and normal males have one X and one Y. An egg always carries a single X, while sperms carry either an X or a Y. That is how sex is determined in humans.[1]

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References[change | edit source]

  1. Bainbridge, David A. 2003. The X in sex: how the X chromosome controls our lives. Harvard.

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