.45 ACP

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.45 ACP
Cartridge .45 ACP CC BY-SA 4.0 by Grasyl.jpg
.45 ACP cartridge full metal jacket
TypePistol
Place of originUnited States
Service history
WarsWorld War I – present
Production history
DesignerJohn Browning
Designed1904
Produced1905–present
Variants.45 ACP +P, .45 Auto Rim, .45 Super, .460 Rowland
Specifications
Case typeRimless, straight
Bullet diameter.452 in (11.5 mm)
Neck diameter.473 in (12.0 mm)
Base diameter.476 in (12.1 mm)
Rim diameter.480 in (12.2 mm)
Rim thickness.049 in (1.2 mm)
Case length.898 in (22.8 mm)
Overall length1.275 in (32.4 mm)
Case capacity26.7 gr H2O (1.73 cm3)
Rifling twist1 in 16 in (406 mm)
Primer typeLarge (some makers are now using Small) Pistol
Maximum pressure (CUP)19,900 psi (137 MPa)
Maximum pressure (SAAMI)21,000 psi (140 MPa)
Ballistic performance
Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy
230 gr (15 g) FMJ, Winchester 835 ft/s (255 m/s) 356 ft⋅lbf (483 J)
165 gr (11 g) Hydra-shok, Federal 1,060 ft/s (320 m/s) 412 ft⋅lbf (559 J)
230 gr (15 g) FMJ, Double Tap 960 ft/s (290 m/s) 471 ft⋅lbf (639 J)
185 gr (12 g) JHP +P, Underwood 1,200 ft/s (370 m/s) 592 ft⋅lbf (803 J)
90 gr (6 g) TFSP, RBCD 2,036 ft/s (621 m/s) 829 ft⋅lbf (1,124 J)

The .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol) or 45 Auto (11.43×23mm)[1] is a type of bullet, made to be used in the M1911 pistol used by the U.S. Military. It was first made by John Browning in 1904, the "ACP" in the name stands for "Automatic Colt Pistol". It was the standard for handguns in the U.S. military until they switched to the Beretta M9 (Beretta 92) in 1985 that used a smaller caliber 9mm bullet.

The .45 is famous for being the bullet used in the M1911 and for being the choice of the U.S. Military for their pistols for almost 75 years. The .45 ACP has good stopping power because of the large size of the bullet, a .45 ACP bullet is almost half an inch. When shot at human targets, the .45 ACP bullet makes a big hole that causes blood loss and leads to faster death.

It was used for guns like the M1911, the Thompson submachine gun, the M3 Grease Gun, the USP45, the UMP45, the TDI Kriss Super V, the MAC-10, and many other guns.

References[change | change source]

  1. JEFFREY., STRICKLAND, PRESIDENT (2014). HANDBOOK OF HANDGUNS. [S.l.]: LULU COM. p. 151. ISBN 978-1300973294. OCLC 1020871429.