Abrahamic religion

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Symbols of the three largest Abrahamic religions: the Jewish Star of David, the Christian cross, and the star and crescent used to represent Islam.

An Abrahamic Religion is a religion whose followers believe in the prophet Abraham. They believe Abraham and his sons/grandsons hold an important role in human spiritual development. The best known Abrahamic religions are Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Smaller religious traditions sometimes included as Abrahamic religions are Samaritanism, Druze, Rastafari, Babism and Bahá'í Faith. Mandaeism (a religion that holds many Abrahamic beliefs) is not called Abrahamic because its followers think Abraham was a false prophet

True Abrahamic religions are monotheistic (the belief that there is only one God). They also all believe that people should pray to God and worship God often. Among monotheistic religions, the Abrahamic religions have the world's largest number of followers. They are also all ethical monotheistic religions. This means they have rules that they have to follow.

Religions[change | change source]

Religion Founded in Claims descend from Central symbol Central scripture Central figure Adherents Population
Christianity 1st century CE Isaac and Joseph Christian cross Christian Bible Jesus Christians 2.4 billion
Islam 7th century CE Ischmael Star and crescent Quran Muhammad Muslims 1.9 billion
Judaism 20th–18th century BCE Isaac and Joseph Star of David Tanakh Moses Jews 14 million
Druze 11th century CE Ischmael Druze star Hikmah Hamza Muwahiddun 5 million
Samaritanism 20th–18th century BCE Isaac and Joseph Pentetuch Moses Samaritians 820 followers
Bahá'í Faith 19th century CE Keturah's children 9-pointed star Aqdas Bahá'ullah Baha'is 10 million