Albany, Georgia

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City of Albany, Georgia
City
Nickname(s): The Good Life City, The Artesian City
Location in Dougherty County and the state of Georgia
Location in Dougherty County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 31°34′56″N 84°9′56″W / 31.58222°N 84.16556°W / 31.58222; -84.16556Coordinates: 31°34′56″N 84°9′56″W / 31.58222°N 84.16556°W / 31.58222; -84.16556
Country United States
State Georgia
County Dougherty
Incorporated (city) December 27, 1838
Government
 • Mayor Dorothy Hubbard (D)
Area
 • City 55.9 sq mi (144.7 km2)
 • Land 55.5 sq mi (144.8 km2)
 • Water 0.3 sq mi (0.9 km2)
Elevation 203 ft (62 m)
Population (2010)[1]
 • City 77,434 (city proper)
 • Density 1,385.5/sq mi (535.0/km2)
 • Metro 157,308
 • Demonym Albanian
  2010 metro pop.[2]
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code(s) 31701, 31705, 31707, 31721, 31763
Area code(s) 229
FIPS code 13-01052[3]
GNIS feature ID 0310424[4]
Website http://www.albany.ga.us

Albany is a city, in and the county seat of Dougherty County, Georgia, United States, in the southwestern part of the state. The population was 77,434 at the 2010 U.S. Census, making it the eighth-largest city in Georgia.[1]

Legendary singer Ray Charles was born in Albany in 1930.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Albany (city) QuickFacts from the US Census Bureau". Quickfacts.census.gov. Retrieved April 14, 2012. 
  2. "Annual Estimates of the Population of Metropolitan and Micropolitan Statistical Areas:April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007 (CBSA-EST2007-01)" (CSV). 2007 Population Estimates. United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 27, 2008. Retrieved May 22, 2008. 
  3. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

Further reading[change | change source]

  • Carolyn Clive, Frances Davis, and Tom Liner, eds., Glancing Backward: Albany, Georgia, 1836–1986 (Albany, Ga.: Dougherty County School System and Sesquicentennial Publication Committee, 1986).
  • Lee W. Formwalt, "A Garden of Irony and Diversity," in The New Georgia Guide (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1996).
  • Joseph Winthrop Holley, You Can't Build a Chimney from the Top: The South through the Life of a Negro Educator (New York: William-Frederick Press, 1948).
  • Thronateeska Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, History and Reminiscences of Dougherty County, Georgia (1924; reprint, Spartanburg, S.C.: Reprint Co., 1978).
  • Works Progress Administration, Historical Background of Dougherty County, 1836–1940 (Atlanta: Cherokee, 1981).

Other websites[change | change source]