Bob Kahn

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Bob Kahn
Bob Kahn.jpg
Bob Kahn in Geneva, May 2013
Born Robert Elliott Kahn
(1938-12-23) December 23, 1938 (age 79)
Brooklyn, New York
Nationality American
Alma mater City College of New York (B.E.E., 1960)
Princeton University (M.A., 1962; Ph.D., 1964)
Known for TCP/IP
the father of the Internet
Spouse(s) Patrice Ann Lyons
Awards
Scientific career
Fields Telecommunications, networking
Institutions Bell Labs
MIT
BBN
DARPA
Corporation for National Research Initiatives

Robert Elliot "Bob" Kahn (born December 23, 1938) is an American electrical engineer. Along with Vint Cerf, invented the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP), the fundamental communication protocols at the heart of the Internet.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Bob Kahn at Wikimedia Commons

  • DBLP Listing of some of Kahn's works
  • Biography of Kahn from IEEE
  • Oral history interview with Robert E. Kahn, Charles Babbage Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. Focuses on Kahn's role in the development of computer networking from 1967 through the early 1980s. Beginning with his work at Bolt Beranek and Newman (BBN), Kahn discusses his involvement as the ARPANET proposal was being written, his decision to become active in its implementation, and his role in the public demonstration of the ARPANET. The interview continues into Kahn's involvement with networking when he moves to IPTO in 1972, where he was responsible for the administrative and technical evolution of the ARPANET, including programs in packet radio, the development of a new network protocol (TCP/IP), and the switch to TCP/IP to connect multiple networks.