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CPR Restoration

From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
CPR Restoration
Company typePrivate
IndustryCleaning, construction
Founded1998; 26 years ago (1998) in Philadelphia, United States
Headquarters
Area served
Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and other states
OwnerCPR, Inc.
Websitewww.cprrestoration.com

CPR Restoration is an American company providing fire and water damage restoration services. It was founded in 1998 with its headquarter in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

CPR Restoration and Cleaning was founded in 1998 with its headquarter in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1]

It provides fire and water damage restoration services for residential and commercial properties. They have also been collaborating with the New York City Fire Department.[2]

Services

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  • Fire damage restoration
  • Water damage restoration

The company provides all types of services related to the fire and water damage properties like clean-up, pack-out, fire odor elimination, dehumidification, smoke removal, soot, minimizing recontamination, structure cleaning, remediation, debris pick-up, and removal services.[2]

Serving locations

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After a great success in Pennsylvania, the company expanded their services to New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Connecticut, and Maryland.[3]

Controversy

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In 2014, a former employee, Stanley Kieffer, of CPR Restoration & Cleaning filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania against his employer companies, CPR LLC and CPR, Inc., claiming that alleging violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the Pennsylvania Human Relations Act (PHRA), the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA), and Pennsylvania state law.[4] Kieffer claimed that he was wrongfully terminated after requesting accommodations for his disabilities and filing a Charge of Discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.[5]

The suit ended with the court granting summary judgment in favor of CPR. The court found that Kieffer did not meet the criteria for protection under the FMLA, and he was not considered a "qualified individual" under the ADA. The court also ruled that Kieffer's requested leave was not a reasonable accommodation, and his retaliation claims lacked sufficient evidence. The decision was made on unspecified dates in 2018, and the Third Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the District Court's judgment.[5]

References

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  1. "CPR Restoration and Cleaning". crunchbase.com. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "CPR Restoration & Cleaning Services LLC Announces Sponsorship for Firemen's Weekend October Event in Wildwood, NJ". www.digitaljournal.com. 22 August 2023. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  3. "About Us | CPR Restoration & Cleaning Services LLC". www.cprrestoration.com. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  4. "Be Reasonable: Employees May Not be Able to Request a "Few Weeks or a Few Months" of Leave as an Accommodation Under the ADA |". www.genovaburns.com. 9 July 2018. Retrieved 11 February 2024.
  5. 5.0 5.1 "Kieffer v. CPR Restoration & Cleaning Servs., LLC, No. 16-3423 | Casetext Search + Citator". casetext.com. Retrieved 11 February 2024.