Cape flower region

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Some of the unique flora at the Cape Peninsula, South Africa
Typical for fynbos vegetation is plants that stay green all year round and small shrubs with hard leaves

The Cape flower region is a nature area near the south end of South Africa.

The region is the smallest of the six "flower kingdoms" of the world, as recognised by Ronald Good.[1] Its formal title is the Cape (South Africa) Floristic Region.

The region has very high diversity. Many kinds of plants are found there. Most of them are unique. There are more than 9,000 vascular plant species. Sixty-nine of them are found only there.

Much of this diversity is because of the fynbos, a Mediterranean-type shrubland that can easily be destroyed by wildfires.[2] The economic worth of the fynbos area may be about R77 million a year from harvests of products (like wildflowers) and from eco-tourism.[2] The Cape flower region has both economic and biological value. It is a good place to look for many kinds of plants, insects, small animals and other creatures in nature.[2]

References[change | change source]

  1. Good, Ronald D'Oyley 1947. The geography of the flowering plants.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Odendaal L.J; Haupt T.M. & Griffiths C.L. 2008. The alien invasive land snail in the West Coast National Park: is there cause for concern? Koedoe - African Protected Area Conservation and Science 50 (1): 93-98. abstract, doi:10.4102/koedoe.v50i1.153.

Other websites[change | change source]

Coordinates: 34°10′00″S 18°22′30″E / 34.16667°S 18.37500°E / -34.16667; 18.37500