Capoid

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Capoid race was a word for the Khoikhoi and San peoples. American anthropologist Carleton S. Coon invented the word in 1962. The words means "looking like a person from the Cape of Good Hope".[1] Coon divided human beings into five races. He called these races Capoid, Congoid, Mongoloid, Australoid, and Caucasoid. Today, scientists agree that there is only one human race. Modern genetic research has shown that the idea of five races was wrong.[2][3]:360

References[change | change source]

  1. The Origin of Races (1962). Moore, Ruth Evolution (Life Nature Library) New York:1962 Time, Inc. Chapter 8: "The Emergence of Modern Homo sapiens" Page 173--First page of picture section "Man and His Genes": The Capoid race is identified as one of the five major races of mankind, along with the Mongoloid, Congoid, Caucasoid, and Australoid races
  2. American Association of Physical Anthropologists (27 March 2019). "AAPA Statement on Race and Racism". American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Retrieved 19 June 2020.
  3. Templeton, A. (2016). EVOLUTION AND NOTIONS OF HUMAN RACE. In Losos J. & Lenski R. (Eds.), How Evolution Shapes Our Lives: Essays on Biology and Society (pp. 346-361). Princeton; Oxford: Princeton University Press. doi:10.2307/j.ctv7h0s6j.26. That this view reflects the consenus among American anthropologists is stated in: Wagner, Jennifer K.; Yu, Joon-Ho; Ifekwunigwe, Jayne O.; Harrell, Tanya M.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Royal, Charmaine D. (February 2017). "Anthropologists' views on race, ancestry, and genetics". American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 162 (2): 318–327. doi:10.1002/ajpa.23120. PMC 5299519. PMID 27874171.