Caron

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ˇ
Caron
Diacritics in Latin & Greek
accent
acute( ´ )
double acute( ˝ )
grave( ` )
double grave(  ̏ )
circumflex( ˆ )
caron, háček( ˇ )
breve( ˘ )
inverted breve(   ̑  )
cedilla( ¸ )
diaeresis, umlaut( ¨ )
dot( · )
palatal hook(   ̡ )
retroflex hook(   ̢ )
hook above, dấu hỏi(  ̉ )
horn(  ̛ )
iota subscript(  ͅ )
macron( ˉ )
ogonek, nosinė( ˛ )
perispomene(  ͂ )
overring( ˚ )
underring( ˳ )
rough breathing( )
smooth breathing( ᾿ )
Marks sometimes used as diacritics
apostrophe( )
bar( ◌̸ )
colon( : )
comma( , )
period( . )
hyphen( ˗ )
prime( )
tilde( ~ )
Diacritical marks in other scripts
Arabic diacritics
Early Cyrillic diacritics
kamora(  ҄ )
pokrytie(  ҇ )
titlo(  ҃ )
Gurmukhī diacritics
Hebrew diacritics
Indic diacritics
anusvara( )
chandrabindu( )
nukta( )
virama( )
visarga( )
IPA diacritics
Japanese diacritics
dakuten( )
handakuten( )
Khmer diacritics
Syriac diacritics
Thai diacritics
Related
Dotted circle
Punctuation marks
Logic symbols

A caron ( ˇ ) or haček (from Czech: háček), is a diacritic. This is a special symbol that is written over some letters to show that they are pronounced differently. Some other names for the caron are: wedge, inverted circumflex, and inverted hat.

The caron is used in Baltic, Slavic and Finno-Lappic languages to show that a letter is pronounced differently than normal. Sometimes the caron is drawn over a letter to show that it used to be pronounced differently. Usually the caron shows:

The caron looks like an upside-down circumflex ( ˆ ). It looks a lot like the breve symbol, but is more pointed at the bottom. It is also used as a symbol in mathematics.