Clause

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A clause is a part of a sentence. Each clause has only one main verb. I love you is a sentence which has only one clause. I love you and I will always love you is a sentence which has two clauses. The two clauses are I love you and I will always love you. These clauses are joined together by the word and (a conjunction). Clauses may be independent or dependent.

In use[change | change source]

Two clauses can be joined with a pronoun. For example: I live in London, which is in England. Here, I live in London is the first clause, and which is in England is the second clause. The word which is a pronoun which takes the place of London. It joins the two clauses. A sentence can contain many clauses. But sentences with fewer clauses are easier to understand.

Dependent and independent clauses[change | change source]

A simple sentence may also be called an independent clause. It may be a part of a compound or complex sentence, but it can also stand on its own as a simple sentence (or independent clause).[1] A subordinate clause also called a dependent clause is one which which cannot stand by itself.[2] This is because it does not express a complete thought.[2] It contains both a subject and a verb.[3] A subordinate clause always depends on a main clause.[4] The main clause makes sense and can stand on its own. However, the subordinating clause does not. For example, I love you makes perfect sense left on its own. However, and always will, does not.

References[change | change source]

  1. Randy Rambo (2012). "Sentences: Simple, Compound, and Complex". English Composition 1. http://www2.ivcc.edu/rambo/eng1001/sentences.htm. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "What Is a Subordinate Clause? (with Examples)". Grammar Monster. http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/subordinate_clause.htm. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  3. Robin L. Simmons (1997). "The Subordinate Clause". Grammar Bytes. http://www.chompchomp.com/terms/subordinateclause.htm. Retrieved 27 December 2015.
  4. "Clauses". Oxford Dictionaries. http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/clauses. Retrieved 27 December 2015.

Other websites[change | change source]