Connie Smith

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Smith in 2007

Constance June Meador (also known as Connie Smith; born August 14, 1941) is an American singer. Her contralto vocals have been described by music writers as significant and influential to the women of country music. A similarity has been noted between her vocal style and that of Patsy Cline.

Smith was discovered in 1963. She signed with RCA Victor Records in 1964. She remained with the label until 1973. Her first single "Once a Day" hit #1 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs chart in November 1964. It was at the top position for eight weeks.[1] "Once a Day" became Smith's biggest hit.

Smith was nominated at the Grammy Awards for Best Female Country Vocal Performance.

Smith's success continued with another 19 top-ten hits during the 1960s and 1970s. Those included "Ain't Had No Lovin'", "Cincinnati, Ohio" and "I Never Once Stopped Loving You."

Smith was nominated for eleven Grammy Awards.

Smith was born in Elkhart, Indiana. She later lived in West Virginia and Ohio.

Awards, nominations and honors[change | change source]

Smith has won two awards from both Billboard Magazine and Cash Box. Besides her nominations from music magazines, she has been nominated for 11 Grammy Awards, one award from the Academy of Country Music, and three awards from the Country Music Association, as well as several nominations from the fan-voted Music City News Awards including one win.

Year Association Category Result Ref.
1964 Billboard Magazine Most Promising Female Country Artist Won [2]
1965 Grammy Awards Best Country and Western Single – "Once a Day" Nominated [2]
Best New Country and Western Artist Nominated [2]
Best Country & Western Vocal Performance, Female – "Once a Day" Nominated [2]
Billboard Magazine Most Promising Female Country Artist Won [2]
Billboard Magazine Favorite Female Country Performer Nominated [2]
Favorite Album (1964–1965) – Connie Smith Nominated [2]
Cash Box Most Promising Female Country Vocalist Won [2]
Country Music Review Most Promising Female Singer Won [2]
1966 Grammy Awards Best Sacred Recording – Connie Smith Sings Great Sacred Songs Nominated [2]
Best Country and Western Vocal Performance, Female – "Ain't Had No Lovin'" Nominated [2]
Billboard Magazine Favorite Female Country Performer Nominated [2]
Favorite Country Album – Cute 'n' Country Nominated [2]
Cash Box Most Programmed Female Artist Won [2]
Country Music Life Award Favorite Female Artist Won [2]
Record World Top Female Vocalist Won [2]
Most Outstanding Female Country and Western Vocalist Won [2]
1967 Billboard Magazine Top Country Artist, Female Vocalist Nominated [2]
Cash Box Most Programmed Female Artist Nominated [2]
Record World Top Female Vocalist Nominated [2]
Country Music Association Awards Female Vocalist of the Year Nominated [2]
1968 Grammy Awards Best Country & Western Solo Vocal Performance, Female – "Cincinnati, Ohio" Nominated [2]
1969 Academy of Country Music Top Female Vocalist Nominated [3]
Grammy Awards Best Country Vocal Performance, Female – "Ribbon of Darkness" Nominated [2]
1970 Country Music Association Female Vocalist of the Year Nominated [2]
1971 Grammy Awards Best Sacred Performance – "Whispering Hope" (with Nat Stuckey) Nominated [2]
1972 Music City News Awards Top Female Vocalist Nominated [2]
Country Music Association Female Vocalist of the Year Nominated [2]
1974 Grammy Awards Best Inspirational Performance – "All the Praises" Nominated [2]
Music City News Awards Top Female Vocalist Nominated [2]
1975 Music City News Awards Top Female Vocalist Nominated [2]
1976 Grammy Awards Best Gospel Performance – Connie Smith Sings Hank Williams Gospel Nominated [2]
1979 Music City News Awards Gospel Group/Act of the Year Won [4]
2002 Country Music Television 40 Greatest Women of Country Music – Rank (#9) Won [5]
2007 Country Universe 100 Greatest Women – Rank (#24) Won [6]
2010 Grammy Awards Best Country Collaboration with Vocals – "Run to You" (with Marty Stuart) Nominated [7]
2012 Country Music Association Country Music Hall of Fame induction Won [8]
2017 Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Country Artists of All Time – Rank (#69) Won [9]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Connie Smith". All Music. Retrieved Jan 2, 2021.
  2. 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 2.17 2.18 2.19 2.20 2.21 2.22 2.23 2.24 2.25 2.26 2.27 2.28 2.29 2.30 Escott, Colin, Born to Sing, p. 36.
  3. "searchable database – Connie Smith". Academy of Country Music. Archived from the original on 10 June 2011. Retrieved 17 August 2010.
  4. "Connie Smith: Awards". Country Music Television. Retrieved 17 August 2010.
  5. "CMT's 40 Greatest Women of Country Music". Am I Annoying. Retrieved 17 August 2010.
  6. "100 Greatest Women". Country Universe. Retrieved 17 August 2010.
  7. "2011 Grammy Award Nominees". Grammy Awards. Retrieved 16 January 2011.
  8. "Connie Smith -- Country Music Hall of Fame". Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved 7 September 2019.
  9. "100 Greatest Country Artists of All Time". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 1 February 2019.