Diana Lynn

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Diana Lynn
Diana Lynn 1952.JPG
Born Dolores Marie Loehr
(1926-07-05)July 5, 1926
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Died December 18, 1971(1971-12-18) (aged 45)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Cause of death stroke
Resting place Church of Heavenly Rest, New York
Nationality American
Years active 1939-1970
Spouse(s) John C. Lindsey (1948–1953) (divorced)
Mortimer Hall (1956–1971) (her death) 4 children
Children Matthew (b. 1958)
Dolly Hall (1960)
Mary (b. 1962)
Margaret (b. 1964)[1]

Diana Lynn (July 5, 1926 – December 18, 1971) was an American actress of the stage, cinema and television.

Early years[change | change source]

Lynn was born Dolores Marie Loehr on July 5, 1926[2], in Los Angeles, California. Her father, Louis Loehr, was an oil supply executive. Her mother, Martha Loehr, was a concert pianist. She was considered a child prodigy.[3] She began taking piano lessons when she was 4 years old, and by the age of 12, she played with the Los Angeles Junior Symphony Orchestra.

Career[change | change source]

In 1939, she made her movie debut playing the piano in They Shall Have Music.[4] She played again, with Susanna Foster, in There's Magic in Music, when it was decided that she had more potential than she had been allowed to show. Later, Paramount Pictures changed her name to "Diana Lynn". They began casting her in movies that allowed her to show her personality and developed her skills as an actress.

As a solo pianist, she released at least one single on Capitol Records[5], accompanied by the Paul Weston orchestra.

In 1964, Lynn had a six-month stint on Broadway, replacing Barbara Bel Geddes in Mary, Mary.[3] In the early 1950s, she starred with Maurice Evans in The Wild Duck on Broadway.[6]

Death[change | change source]

Before filming started on Play It as It Lays, Lynn suffered a stroke and died on December 18, 1971.[7] She was 45.[8]

Filmography[change | change source]

  • They Shall Have Music (1939)
  • The Hard-Boiled Canary (1941)
  • The Major and the Minor (1942)
  • Henry Aldrich Gets Glamour (1942)
  • Henry Aldrich Plays Cupid (1944)
  • The Miracle of Morgan's Creek (1944)
  • Our Hearts Were Young and Gay (1944)
  • And the Angels Sing (1944)
  • Out of This World (1945)
  • The Bride Wore Boots (1946)
  • Our Hearts Were Growing Up (1946)
  • Easy Come, Easy Go (1947)
  • Ruthless (1948)
  • Texas, Brooklyn and Heaven (1948)
  • Every Girl Should Be Married (1948)
  • My Friend Irma (1949)
  • Paid in Full (1950)
  • Peggy (1950)
  • My Friend Irma Goes West (1950)
  • Rogues of Sherwood Forest (1950)
  • The People Against O'Hara (1951)
  • Bedtime for Bonzo (1951)
  • Meet Me at the Fair (1952)
  • Plunder of the Sun (1953)
  • Track of the Cat (1954)
  • The Kentuckian (1955)
  • The Blue and Gold|An Annapolis Story (1955)
  • You're Never Too Young (1955)
  • Company of Killers (1970)

Radio appearances[change | change source]

Year Program Episode/source
1952 Theatre Guild on the Air "The Silver Whistle"[9]
1953 Theatre Guild on the Air Quiet Wedding[10]

References[change | change source]

  1. http://www.glamourgirlsofthesilverscreen.com/show/170/Diana+Lynn/register.php
  2. Copy of birth certificate at Astrodatabank.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Actress Diana Lynn Was Piano Playing Prodigy". The Salina Journal. February 17, 1965. p. 16. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2687572/the_salina_journal/. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  4. Coons, Robbin (June 4, 1943). "Dolly Gets Into Pictures And Is Now Diana Lynn". Big Spring Daily Herald. p. 2. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2689710/big_spring_daily_herald/. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  5. Abrams, Steven; Settlemier, Tyrone. "Capitol 500 - 1000, 78rpm numerical listing discography". The Online Discographical Project. Retrieved December 13, 2016. 
  6. Hopper, Hedda (December 13, 1951). "Stanley Kramer to Produce Movie About 'U.N. Family'". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. Part 4-Page 8. http://archives.chicagotribune.com/1951/12/13/page/54/article/looking-at-hollywood. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  7. "Actress Diana Lynn Dies". The Lincoln Star. December 19, 1971. p. 2. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2689792/the_lincoln_star/. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  8. "Diana Lynn Dies; Actress Was 45", The New York Times, p. 60, December 19, 1971 
  9. Kirby, Walter (April 6, 1952). "Better Radio Programs for the Week". The Decatur Daily Review. p. 52. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2426009/the_decatur_daily_review/. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  10. Kirby, Walter (March 15, 1953). "Better Radio Programs for the Week". The Decatur Daily Review. p. 46. https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2676130/the_decatur_daily_review/. Retrieved December 13, 2016.