Endrin

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Endrin
Names
IUPAC name
(1R,2S,3R,6S,7R,8S,9S,11R)-3,4,5,6,13,13-Hexachloro-10-oxapentacyclo[6.3.1.13,6.02,7.09,11]tridec-4-ene
Other names
Mendrin, Compound 269, (1aR,2S,2aS,3S,6R,6aR,7R,7aS)-3,4,5,6,9,9-hexachloro-1a,2,2a,3,6,6a,7,7a-octahydro-2,7:3,6-dimethanonaphtho[2,3-b]oxirene, 1,2,3,4,10,10-Hexachloro-6,7-epoxy-1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-1,4-endo,endo-5,8-dimethanonaphthalene
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.000.705
EC Number 200-775-7
KEGG
PubChem {{{value}}}
RTECS number IO1575000
UNII
UN number 2761
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C12H8Cl6O
Molar mass 380.907 g/mol
Appearance Colorless to tan crystalline solid
Density 1.77 g/cm3 [1]
Melting point 200 °C (392 °F; 473 K) (decomposes)
0.23 mg/L[2]
Vapor pressure 2.6 x 10-5 Pa[1]
Hazards
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

0
2
0
 
Flash point noncombustible
U.S. Permissible
exposure limit (PEL)
TWA 0.1 mg/m3 [skin][3]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Endrin is an insecticide that was commonplace among cotton growers and for the treament of cereals. It was also used to kill rodents. It is a neurotoxin. It is a stereoisomer of Dieldrin. In the soil, it can take up to twelve years to decay. It is one of the twelve substances listed in the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants, and its production, trade and use is banned since 2004.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Endrin". Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit. Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  2. "Endrin (PDS)". IPCS. Retrieved 13 March 2015.
  3. "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0252". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).