Eric Cantor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Eric Cantor
Eric Cantor, official 113th Congress photo portrait.jpg
House Majority Leader
In office
January 3, 2011 – August 1, 2014
DeputyKevin McCarthy
Preceded bySteny Hoyer
Succeeded byKevin McCarthy
House Minority Whip
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2011
LeaderJohn Boehner
Preceded byRoy Blunt
Succeeded bySteny Hoyer
House Chief Deputy Whip
In office
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2009
LeaderTom DeLay
Roy Blunt (Acting)
John Boehner
Preceded byRoy Blunt
Succeeded byKevin McCarthy
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Virginia's 7th district
In office
January 3, 2001 – August 18, 2014
Preceded byThomas Bliley
Succeeded byDave Brat
Member of the Virginia House of Delegates
from the 73rd district
In office
January 8, 1992 – January 3, 2001
Preceded byWalter Stosch
Succeeded byJohn O'Bannon
Personal details
Born
Eric Ivan Cantor

(1963-06-06) June 6, 1963 (age 56)
Richmond, Virginia, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Diana Fine
ChildrenEvan
Jenna
Michael
Alma materGeorge Washington University
Columbia University
William & Mary Law School
WebsiteGovernment website
Party website

Eric Ivan Cantor (born June 6, 1963) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives from Virginia. He served from 2001 to 2014. He was the House Majority Leader from 2011 to 2014. He is a member of the Republican Party.

Primary loss and resignation[change | change source]

On June 10, 2014, in his bid for re-election, Cantor lost the Republican primary to economics professor Dave Brat. Following his primary defeat, Cantor announced his resignation as House Majority Leader effective July 31.[1] In an interview with the Richmond Times-Dispatch on July 31, 2014, Cantor revealed that he will resign from Congress effective August 18. He also said that he has asked Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe to call for a special election on November 4, 2014 that would coincide with the general election.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Eric Cantor will leave House leadership post after stunning loss". CNN. June 11, 2014.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Eric Cantor at Wikimedia Commons