Ethiopian Semitic languages

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Ethiopian Semitic
Geographic
distribution:
Eritrea, Ethiopia, Sudan
Linguistic classification:Afro-Asiatic
Subdivisions:

Ethiopian Semitic (also called Ethio-Semitic, Ethiosemitic, Ethiopic or Abyssinian[1]) is a family of languages. These languages are spoken in Ethiopia, Eritrea and Sudan. They are a part of the South Semitic languages.

Amharic is the most used Ethiopian Semitic language. It is the official working language of Ethiopia and has about 62 million speakers (including second language speakers). Tigrinya has 7 million speakers and is the most spoken language in Eritrea.[2][3] The Ge'ez language is a religious language that is used in the Ethiopian and Eritrean Orthodox Tewahedo Churches. There is writing in this language that is as old as the first century AD. It is no longer spoken in daily life.

The modern Ethiopian Semitic languages all have the subject–object–verb (SOV) word order. Ge'ez had the verb-subject-object (VSO) order.

Classification[change | change source]

Grover Hudson (2013) says that there are five main branches of Ethiosemitic. This classification is given below.[4]

Ethiosemitic

References[change | change source]

  1. Igor Mikhailovich Diakonov Semito-Hamitic Languages: An Essay in Classification - Google Books": Nauka, Central Department of Oriental Literature, (1965) pp 12
  2. Woldemikael, Tekle M. (April 2003). "Language, Education, and Public Policy in Eritrea". African Studies Review. 46 (1): 117–136. doi:10.2307/1514983. JSTOR 1514983.
  3. "Microsoft Word - Bilan96-06-Eâ¦" (PDF). Retrieved 2019-06-12.
  4. Hudson, Grover (2013). Northeast African Semitic: Lexical Comparisons and Analysis. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz. p. 289.

References[change | change source]

  • Cohen, Marcel. 1931. Études d’éthiopien méridional. Paris.
  • Hetzron, Robert. 1972. Ethiopian Semitic: studies in classification. Manchester: Manchester University Press.
  • Weninger, Stefan. Vom Altäthiopischen zu den neuäthiopischen Sprachen. Language Typology and Language Universals. Edited by Martin Haspelmath, Ekkehard König, Wulf Oesterreicher, Wolfgang Raible, Vol. 2: 1762-1774. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Terrazas, Aaron Matteo (June 2007). "Beyond Regional Circularity: The Emergence of an Ethiopian Diaspora". Migration Policy Institute. Retrieved 25 November 2011.
  2. United States Census Bureau 2009–2013, Detailed Languages Spoken at Home and Ability to Speak English for the Population 5 Years and Over: 2009–2013, USCB, 30 November 2016, <https://www.census.gov/data/tables/2013/demo/2009-2013-lang-tables.html>.
  3. "Istat.it". Statistics Italy.
  4. "Ethiopian London". BBC. Retrieved 6 December 2008.
  5. pp, 25 (2015) United Kingdom. Available at: https://www.ethnologue.com/country/GB (Accessed: 30 November 2016).
  6. "United Kingdom". Ethnologue.com. Retrieved 26 August 2017.
  7. "Anzahl der Ausländer in Deutschland nach Herkunftsland". Das Statistik Portal.
  8. Amharas are estimated to be the largest ethnic group of estimated 20.000 Ethiopian Germans|https://www.giz.de/fachexpertise/downloads/gtz2009-en-ethiopian-diaspora.pdf Archived 4 October 2018 at the Wayback Machine
  9. "Foreign-born persons by country of birth, age, sex and year". Statistics Sweden.
  10. "Immigrants and Norwegian-born to immigrant parents". Statistics Norway.
  11. Canada, Government of Canada, Statistics (5 February 2013). "2011 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations — Detailed Mother Tongue (232), Knowledge of Official Languages (5), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the Population Excluding Institutional Residents of Canada and Forward Sortation Areas, 2011 Census". 12.statcan.gc.ca. Retrieved 26 August 2017.
  12. Statistics Canada, 2011 Census of Population, Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 98–314-XCB2011032
  13. Anon, 2016. 2011 Census of Canada: Topic-based tabulations | Detailed Mother Tongue (232), Knowledge of Official Languages (5), Age Groups (17A) and Sex (3) for the Population Excluding Institutional Residents of Canada and Forward Sortation Areas, 2011 Census. [online] Www12.statcan.gc.ca. Available at: <http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/tbt-tt/Rp-eng.cfm?LANG=E&APATH=3&DETAIL=0&DIM=0&FL=A&FREE=0&GC=0&GID=0&GK=0&GRP=1&PID=103001&PRID=10&PTYPE=101955&S=0&SHOWALL=0&SUB=0&Temporal=2011&THEME=90&VID=0&VNAMEE=&VNAMEF=> [Accessed 2 December 2016].
  14. Immigrant languages in Canada. 2016. Immigrant languages in Canada. [ONLINE] Available at: https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-314-x/98-314-x2011003_2-eng.cfm. [Accessed 13 December 2016].
  15. "Population by migration background". Statistics Netherlands.
  16. "Population by country of origin". Statistics Denmark.
  17. "The People of Australia Statistics from the 2011 Census, Cat. no. 2901.0, ABS" (PDF). Australian Bureau of Statistics. 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 17 April 2017. Retrieved 26 August 2017.
  18. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2014, The People of Australia Statistics from the 2011 Census, Cat. no. 2901.0, ABS, 30 November 2016, <https://www.border.gov.au/ReportsandPublications/Documents/research/people-australia-2013-statistics.pdf Archived 17 April 2017 at the Wayback Machine>.
  19. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2014, The People of Australia Statistics from the 2011 Census, Cat. no. 2901.0, ABS, 30 November 2016, Archived 17 April 2017 at the Wayback Machine
  20. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 26 June 2018. Retrieved 2 May 2019.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)


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