Ethylene glycol

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Ethylene glycol
Spacefill model of ethylene glycol
Ball and stick model of ethylene glycol
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Ethane-1,2-diol
Other names
Ethylene glycol
1,2-Ethanediol
Ethylene alcohol
Hypodicarbonous acid
Monoethylene glycol
1,2-Dihydroxyethane
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
3DMet {{{value}}}
Abbreviations MEG
Beilstein Reference 505945
ChEBI
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.159
EC Number 203-473-3
Gmelin Reference 943
KEGG
MeSH {{{value}}}
PubChem {{{value}}}
RTECS number KW2975000
UNII
UN number 3082
SMILES {{{value}}}
Properties
C2H6O2
Molar mass 62.07 g·mol−1
Appearance Clear, colorless liquid
Odor Odorless[1]
Density 1.1132 g/cm3
Melting point −12.9 °C (8.8 °F; 260.2 K)
Boiling point 197.3 °C (387.1 °F; 470.4 K)
Miscible
Solubility Soluble in most organic solvents
log P -1.69[2]
Vapor pressure 0.06 mmHg (20 °C)[1]
Viscosity 1.61×10−2 Pa·s[3]
Hazards
Main hazards Harmful
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

1
2
0
 
Explosive limits 3.2–15.2%[1]
U.S. Permissible
exposure limit (PEL)
None[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Ethylene glycol (IUPAC name: ethane-1,2-diol) is an organic compound with the chemical formula (CH
2
OH)
2. It is used to make polyester and to make antifreeze.[4]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0272". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  2. "Ethylene glycol". www.chemsrc.com.
  3. Elert, Glenn. "Viscosity". The Physics Hypertextbook. Retrieved 2007-10-02.
  4. Siegfried Rebsdat; Dieter Mayer. Ethylene Glycol. doi:10.1002/14356007.a10_101.