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Halal (حلال, halāl, halaal) is an Islamic Arabic term meaning "permissible". It has both a general and specific meaning.

When people use the word in Islamic countries, they usually mean to say what is allowed by Islamic Law. In non-Islamic countries, the word usually means fit to be eaten by a Muslim.

Muslims have strict rules of what they can and cannot eat:

  • Animals need to be killed in a special way. ( The animal should be slaughtered by hand so that all the blood could be drained from the slaughtered {dead} animal before they can eat the animal. It is called "Zabah Halal" in Arabic language meaning "Permissible Slaughter".)
  • Muslims cannot consume carcass animals even the animal slaughtered by knife not in its neck called mari' and wajadan. Hunting animals can but in a manner way.
  • They also should not eat the meat of carnivores or omnivores. This includes pork.
  • Fish that has scales is halal, but animals that live both in the water and on land are not permissible (for example, frogs may not be eaten). There is a debate about shellfish, but most think it is not halal.
  • They should not drink alcohol or consume other intoxicating substances (for example, narcotics).

A similar concept is the Jewish Kosher (or Kashrut).