Halim El-Dabh

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Halim El-Dabh at a Cleveland festival in 2009.

Halim Abdul Messieh El-Dabh (Arabic: حليم عبد المسيح الضبع (Ḥalīm ʻAbd al-Masīḥ al-Ḍabʻ); March 4, 1921 – September 2, 2017) was an Egyptian-born American composer, performer, ethnomusicologist, and educator. He has a career spanning six decades. He is known as an early pioneer of electronic music,[1] for having composed in 1944 the first piece of electronic tape music.[2][3]

References[change | change source]

  1. Holmes, Thom (2008). "Early Synthesizers and Experimenters". Electronic and experimental music: technology, music, and culture (3rd ed.). Taylor & Francis. p. 156. ISBN 0-415-95781-8. https://books.google.com/books?id=hCthQ-bec-QC&pg=PA156. Retrieved 2011-06-04.
  2. "The Wire, Volumes 275-280", The Wire: p. 24, 2007, https://books.google.com/books?id=lvo4AQAAIAAJ, retrieved 2011-06-05
  3. Holmes, Thom (2008). "Early Synthesizers and Experimenters". Electronic and experimental music: technology, music, and culture (3rd ed.). Taylor & Francis. pp. 153–4 & 156–7. ISBN 0-415-95781-8. https://books.google.com/books?id=hCthQ-bec-QC&pg=PA106. Retrieved 2011-06-04.

Other websites[change | change source]