Hydrogen telluride

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Hydrogen telluride
Structural diagram of the hydrogen telluride molecule
Space-filling model of the hydrogen telluride molecule
Names
IUPAC name
hydrogen telluride
Other names
hydrotelluric acid
tellane
tellurium hydride
Identifiers
ECHA InfoCard 100.029.073
PubChem {{{value}}}
Properties
H2Te
Molar mass 129.6158 g mol−1
Appearance colourless gas
Density 3.310 g/cm3, gas
2.57 g/cm3 (-20 °C, liquid)
Melting point −49 °C (224 K) ( [1]
Boiling point −2.2 °C (271.8 K)(unstable above -2 °C)
0.70 g/100 mL
Acidity (pKa) 2.6
Structure
bent
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
0.7684 kJ/g
Hazards
Main hazards toxic
Related compounds
Other anions H2O
H2S
H2Se
H2Po
Other cations Na2Te
Ag2Te
Related compounds telluric acid
tellurous acid
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Hydrogen telluride, also known as hydrotelluric acid, tellane, or tellurium hydride, is a chemical compound. It is also an acid. Its chemical formula is H2Te. It contains hydrogen and telluride ions.

Properties[change | change source]

Hydrogen telluride is a toxic reactive gas. It easily decomposes to hydrogen and tellurium. It also burns in air to make tellurium dioxide and water. It has a very bad smell of decayed garlic. It is almost as acidic as phosphoric acid. It reacts with some metals and metal oxides to make tellurides.

Preparation[change | change source]

It is made by adding a strong acid to a telluride, such as sodium telluride.

Uses[change | change source]

Hydrogen telluride does not have many uses because it is very toxic and unstable.

Related pages[change | change source]

Sources[change | change source]

  1. Lide, David R., ed. (2006). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87th ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. ISBN 0-8493-0487-3.