Ionic order

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Closeup of Ionic Order Column. The scroll-like ornament at the top of the column is a volute

The Ionic order is one of the three main classical orders (styles) of ancient Greek and Roman architecture.[1] The other two are the Doric order and the Corinthian order (which gave rise to the Composite order).[2] The Ionic capital is notable for its use of volutes.[3] The Ionic columns normally stand on a base which separates the shaft of the column from the stylobate or platform. The cap is usually enriched with egg-and-dart.[4] It was a popular style in Athens.[5] The Athenians considered themselves Ionians.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Ionic Order of Greek Architecture: Definition & Example Buildings". Study.com. http://study.com/academy/lesson/ionic-order-of-greek-architecture-definition-example-buildings-quiz.html. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  2. "Greek architectural orders". Khan Academy. https://www.khanacademy.org/humanities/ancient-art-civilizations/greek-art/beginners-guide-greece/a/greek-architectural-orders. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  3. "Ionic Order". University of Chicago. http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/greece/paganism/ionic.html. Retrieved 15 February 2016.
  4. James Stevens Curl, Classical Architecture: An Introduction to Its Vocabulary and Essentials, with a Select Glossary of Terms (New York: Norton, 2003), p. 24
  5. 5.0 5.1 Fred Kleiner, Gardner's Art through the Ages: Backpack Edition, Book 1 (Boston: Wadsworth, 2013), p. 116