John Conyers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
John Conyers
John Conyers 113th Congress.jpg
Dean of the United States House of Representatives
In office
January 3, 2015 – December 5, 2017
Preceded byJohn Dingell
Succeeded byDon Young
Chairperson of the House Judiciary Committee
In office
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2011
Preceded byJim Sensenbrenner
Succeeded byLamar Smith
Chairperson of the House Government Operations Committee
In office
January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1995
Preceded byJack Brooks
Succeeded byBill Clinger
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan's 13th district
In office
January 3, 2013 – December 5, 2017
Preceded byHansen Clarke
Succeeded byBrenda Jones
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan's 14th district
In office
January 3, 1993 – January 3, 2013
Preceded byDennis Hertel
Succeeded byGary Peters
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Michigan's 1st district
In office
January 3, 1965 – January 3, 1993
Preceded byLucien Nedzi
Succeeded byBart Stupak
Personal details
Born
John James Conyers, Jr.

(1929-05-16) May 16, 1929 (age 90)
Highland Park, Michigan, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Monica Esters (1990–present)
ChildrenJohn
Carl
Alma materWayne State University
Signature
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/serviceArmy National Guard
United States Army
Years of service1948–1950
1950–1957
Battles/warsKorean War

John James Conyers, Jr. (born May 16, 1929) is an American politician. He served as the U.S. Representative for Michigan's 13th district,[1] serving in Congress from 1965 (the district was numbered as the 1st District until 1993, and as the 14th district from 1993 to 2013) until his resignation in 2017. He is a member of the Democratic Party. Conyers, was its longest-serving member, and was the Dean of the House of Representatives. He was also the longest-serving member of the entire United States Congress.

In November 2017, Conyers was accused of sexual harassment and for paying off the accuser.[2][3] House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi called on Conyers to resign.[4] On December 5, 2017, Conyers resigned his seat in the US House of Representatives because of his mounting sexual scandals.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Gray, Kathleen. "Detroit Free Press – John Conyers and Gary Peters on track back to U.S. House". The Detroit Free Press. The Detroit Free Press. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  2. "Conyers scandal rocks House Democrats". POLITICO. Retrieved 2017-11-21.
  3. McLeod, Paul (20 November 2017). "She complained that a powerful congressman harassed her. Here's why you didn't hear her story". BuzzFeed. Retrieved 20 November 2017.
  4. Yamiche Alcindor (November 30, 2017). "House Leaders Call on Conyers to Resign After an Accuser Details Her Charges". The New York Times.
  5. Gideon Resnick (December 5, 2017). "Conyers Retires, Family Feud Ensues". The Daily Beast.

Other websites[change | change source]