Juno (spacecraft)

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Juno
Juno Transparent.png
Artist's rendering of the Juno spacecraft
Mission type Jupiter orbiter
Operator NASA / JPL
COSPAR ID 2011-040A
SATCAT no. 37773
Website
Mission duration Planned: 7 years
Elapsed: 7 years, 2 months, 6 days

Cruise: 4 years 11 months
Science phase: 2 years
Spacecraft properties
Manufacturer Lockheed Martin
Launch mass 3,625 kg (7,992 lb)[1]
Dry mass 1,593 kg (3,512 lb)[2]
Dimensions 20.1 × 4.6 m (66 × 15 ft)[2]
Power 14 kW at Earth,[2] 435 W at Jupiter[1]
2 × 55-A·h lithium-ion batteries[2]
Start of mission
Launch date August 5, 2011, 16:25 (2011-08-05UTC16:25) UTC
Rocket Atlas V 551 (AV-029)
Launch site Cape Canaveral SLC-41
Contractor United Launch Alliance
Flyby of Earth
Closest approach October 9, 2013
Distance 559 km (347 mi)
Jupiter orbiter
Orbital insertion July 5, 2016, 03:53 UTC[3]
2 years, 3 months, 6 days ago
Orbits 37 (planned)[4][5]
Orbit parameters
Perijove 4,200 km (2,600 mi) altitude
75,600 km (47,000 mi) radius
Apojove 8.1 million kilometers
Inclination 90 degrees (polar orbit)

Juno mission insignia.svg
Juno mission insignia

Juno is an unmanned NASA New Frontiers spacecraft. It studies the planet Jupiter from orbit. The spacecraft was launched on August 5, 2011 from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and entered a polar orbit of Jupiter on July 5, 2016. Scott Bolton is leading the mission.[6]

Juno's main goal is to understand the origin and evolution of Jupiter.[6][7][8][9] Juno will also study the planet's atmospheric composition, gravity field, magnetic field, and polar magnetosphere.[7][9][10]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Juno Mission to Jupiter" (PDF). NASA FACTS. NASA. April 2009. p. 1. Retrieved April 5, 2011.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 "Jupiter Orbit Insertion Press Kit" (PDF). NASA. 2016. Retrieved July 7, 2016.
  3. Foust, Jeff (July 5, 2016). "Juno enters orbit around Jupiter". Space News. Retrieved August 25, 2016.
  4. Chang, Kenneth (July 5, 2016). "NASA's Juno Spacecraft Enters Jupiter's Orbit". The New York Times. Retrieved July 5, 2016.
  5. Greicius, Tony (September 21, 2015). "Juno – Mission Overview". NASA. Retrieved October 2, 2015.
  6. 6.0 6.1 Sutherland, Paul (August 2011), Sky at Night Magazine, BBC Magazines Bristol (75), p. 37-42 Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Juno Science Objectives". 2010-05-10. Retrieved 2011-07-29.
  8. Dodge, Randy; Boyles, Mark A.; Rasbach, Chuck E. "Key and Driving Requirements for the Juno Payload Suite of Instruments" (PDF). American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Retrieved 2011-07-30.
  9. 9.0 9.1 Whatmore, Rebecca, ed. (2010-01-28). "Mission Overview". NASA. Retrieved 2011-07-21.
  10. "Juno Mission to Jupiter" (PDF). NASA. Retrieved 2011-07-21.

Other websites[change | change source]