Lewis Lehrman

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Lewis E. "Lew" Lehrman (born August 15, 1938) is an American investment banker, businessman, Republican politician, economist, and historian. He supports the ongoing study of American history. He was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

He was presented the National Humanities Medal[1] at the White House in 2005 for his contributions to American History, the study of President Abraham Lincoln and monetary policy.

Career[change | change source]

He was a member of the Advisory Committee of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission and the Lincoln Forum. Lehrman authored Lincoln at Peoria: The Turning Point,[2] (2008), Lincoln "by littles" (2013). Churchill, Roosevelt & Company (2017) and Lincoln & Churchill: Statesmen at War (2018).

His works on monetary policy include True Gold Standard, Newly Revised and Enlarged, Second Edition[3] (2012) and Money, Gold, and History (2013) as well as co-authoring Money and the Coming World Order (1976) and The Case for Gold (1982).

He has written for major news publications such as The Washington Post, The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.

He is a senior partner at L. E. Lehrman & Co.,[4] an investment firm he established in 1981. He is also the chairman of the Lehrman Institute, a public policy research and grant making foundation founded in 1972.

Honors[change | change source]

He and Richard Gilder were awarded the National Humanities Medal in an Oval Office ceremony on Thursday, November 10, 2005.[5] The Medal was presented by President George W. Bush.[6]

References[change | change source]

  1. "National Medal of Arts Recipients and National Humanities Medal Recipients". Georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov. 2005-11-10. Retrieved 2011-01-02.
  2. Lehrman, Lewis. "Lincoln at Peoria: The Turning Point".
  3. Lehrman, Lewis. "The True Gold Standard". The True Gold Standard, Newly Revised and Enlarged, Second Edition.
  4. "Lewis E. Lehrman – Biography".
  5. "Awards & Honors: 2005 National Humanities Medalist".
  6. Oppenheimer, Mark (2015-06-12). "An Opus Dei Priest With a Magnetic Touch". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2015-10-12.