Lionel Jospin

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Lionel Jospin
Lionel Jospin, mai 2014, Rennes, France (cropped).jpg
Jospin in May 2014
Prime Minister of France
In office
3 June 1997 – 6 May 2002
PresidentJacques Chirac
Preceded byAlain Juppé
Succeeded byJean-Pierre Raffarin
First Secretary of the Socialist Party
In office
14 October 1995 – 27 November 1997
Preceded byHenri Emmanuelli
Succeeded byFrançois Hollande
In office
24 January 1981 – 14 May 1988
Preceded byFrançois Mitterrand
Succeeded byPierre Mauroy
Minister of National Education
In office
12 May 1988 – 2 April 1992
PresidentFrançois Mitterrand
Prime MinisterMichel Rocard
Édith Cresson
Preceded byRené Monory
Succeeded byJack Lang
Minister of Sport
In office
10 May 1988 – 16 May 1991
PresidentFrançois Mitterrand
Prime MinisterMichel Rocard
Preceded byAlain Calmat
Succeeded byFrédérique Bredin
Member of the Constitutional Council of France
Assumed office
6 January 2015
PresidentJean-Louis Debré
Laurent Fabius
Preceded byJacques Barrot
Personal details
Born (1937-07-12) 12 July 1937 (age 82)
Meudon, France
NationalityFrench
Political partySocialist Party
Spouse(s)Élisabeth (div).
Sylviane Agacinski
ChildrenEva Jospin
Hugo Jospin
Alma materSciences Po, ÉNA
OccupationActivist
Civil servant
Signature

Lionel Jospin (French: [ljɔnɛl ʒɔspɛ̃]; born 12 July 1937) is a French politician. He served as Prime Minister of France from 1997 to 2002.

Jospin was the Socialist Party candidate for President of France in the elections of 1995 and 2002. He was narrowly defeated in the final runoff election by Jacques Chirac in 1995. He ran for President again in 2002, and was eliminated in the first round due to finishing behind both Chirac and the far-right candidate Jean-Marie Le Pen.

After his loss in the 2002 presidential election, he immediately announced his retirement from politics.[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. Sciolino, Elaine (29 September 2006). "Veteran French Socialist Steps Aside as Candidate for President". New York Times. Retrieved 8 November 2010.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Lionel Jospin at Wikimedia Commons