François Mitterrand

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François Mitterrand
Reagan Mitterrand 1984 (cropped).jpg
President of France
In office
21 May 1981 – 17 May 1995
Prime Minister Pierre Mauroy
Laurent Fabius
Jacques Chirac
Michel Rocard
Édith Cresson
Pierre Bérégovoy
Édouard Balladur
Preceded by Valéry Giscard d'Estaing
Succeeded by Jacques Chirac
Co-Prince of Andorra
In office
21 May 1981 – 17 May 1995
Prime Minister Òscar Ribas Reig
Josep Pintat-Solans
Òscar Ribas Reig
Marc Forné Molné
Served with Joan Martí Alanis
Representative Jean-Yves Caullet
Preceded by Valéry Giscard d'Estaing
Succeeded by Jacques Chirac
Personal details
Born François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand
(1916-10-26)26 October 1916
Jarnac, France
Died 8 January 1996(1996-01-08) (aged 79)
Paris, France
Resting place Cimetiere des Grands-Maisons
Jarnac, France
Political party Cross of Fire (Before 1936)
Democratic and Socialist Union of the Resistance (1945–1964)
Convention of Republican Institutions (1964–1971)
Socialist Party (1971–1996)
Spouse(s) Danielle Gouze
(m. 1944; his death 1996)
Children 4, including Jean-Christophe and Mazarine Pingeot Mitterrand
Relatives Frédéric Mitterrand (nephew)
Alma mater University of Paris
Sciences Po

François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand (26 October 1916 - 8 January 1996) was a French politician who served as the President of the French Republic from 21 May 1981 until 17 May 1995. He was born in Jarnac in the Charente department. He was a member of the Socialist Party. Before being elected president, he had held several positions in the French Cabinet. As President of France, he was also one of the Co-Princes of Andorra. Jacques Chirac was President of France and ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra after him. Mitterrand died of prostate cancer in Paris.[1] He was laid to rest in his birthplace Jarnac.

From 1959 to 1981, Mitterrand was also mayor of Château-Chinon (Ville), a municipality in the Nièvre department.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Francois Mitterrand Dies at 79; Champion of a Unified Europe". The New York Times. January 9, 1996. Retrieved August 21, 2011.