François Mitterrand

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François Mitterrand
Reagan Mitterrand 1984 (cropped).jpg
President of France
In office
21 May 1981 – 17 May 1995
Prime MinisterPierre Mauroy
Laurent Fabius
Jacques Chirac
Michel Rocard
Édith Cresson
Pierre Bérégovoy
Édouard Balladur
Preceded byValéry Giscard d'Estaing
Succeeded byJacques Chirac
Co-Prince of Andorra
In office
21 May 1981 – 17 May 1995
Prime MinisterÒscar Ribas Reig
Josep Pintat-Solans
Òscar Ribas Reig
Marc Forné Molné
Served withJoan Martí Alanis
RepresentativeJean-Yves Caullet
Preceded byValéry Giscard d'Estaing
Succeeded byJacques Chirac
Personal details
BornFrançois Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand
(1916-10-26)26 October 1916
Jarnac, France
Died8 January 1996(1996-01-08) (aged 79)
Paris, France
Resting placeCimetiere des Grands-Maisons
Jarnac, France
Political partyCross of Fire (Before 1936)
Democratic and Socialist Union of the Resistance (1945–1964)
Convention of Republican Institutions (1964–1971)
Socialist Party (1971–1996)
Spouse(s)
Danielle Gouze
(m. 1944; his death 1996)
Children4, including Jean-Christophe and Mazarine Pingeot Mitterrand
RelativesFrédéric Mitterrand (nephew)
Alma materUniversity of Paris
Sciences Po

François Maurice Adrien Marie Mitterrand (26 October 1916 - 8 January 1996) was a French politician who was the President of the French Republic from 21 May 1981 until 17 May 1995. He was born in Jarnac in the Charente department. He was a member of the Socialist Party. Before being elected president, he had held several positions in the French Cabinet. As President of France, he was also one of the Co-Princes of Andorra. Jacques Chirac was President of France and ex officio Co-Prince of Andorra after him. Mitterrand died of prostate cancer in Paris.[1] He was laid to rest in his birthplace Jarnac.

From 1959 to 1981, Mitterrand was also mayor of Château-Chinon (Ville), a municipality in the Nièvre department.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Francois Mitterrand Dies at 79; Champion of a Unified Europe". The New York Times. January 9, 1996. Retrieved August 21, 2011.