Louis Pasteur

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Louis Pasteur, microbiologist and chemist known for germ theory and vaccinations to reduce diseases.

Louis Pasteur (December 27, 1822 – September 28, 1895) was a French microbiologist and chemist.[1] He and also his wife, Marie, are best known for their experiments supporting the Germ theory of disease, and he is also known for his vaccinations, most notably the first vaccine against rabies. He made many discoveries in the field of chemistry, most notably the asymmetry (different shapes) of crystals. He is also well known for his way of keeping milk and wine from going sour for longer. That process is called pasteurization.

Pasteur's later work on diseases included work on chicken cholera. During this work, Pasteur noticed how a culture of the responsible bacteria had spoiled, and it failed to induce the disease in some chickens which he was infecting with the disease.

Early life[change | edit source]

Louis Pasteur was born on December 27, 1822, in Dole in the Jura region of France, into the family of a poor tanner. Louis grew up in the town of Arbois.[2] He gained degrees in Letters and in Mathematical Sciences before entering the École Normale Supérieure, an elite college. After serving briefly as professor of physics at Dijon Lycée in 1848, he became professor of chemistry at the University of Strasbourg,[2] where he met and courted Marie Laurent, daughter of the university's rector, in 1849.

Louis Pasteur and Marie were married on May 29, 1849, and together had five children. Only two survived to adulthood; his other three children had died of typhoid fever. These personal tragedies inspired Pasteur to try to find cures for diseases, such as typhoid.

Death[change | edit source]

In 1895 at Marnes-la-Coquette, a commune in Paris, Pasteur died after several strokes.

References[change | edit source]

  1. "Pasteur, Louis - Biographical entry - Encyclopedia of Australian Science". eoas.info. http://www.eoas.info/biogs/P000693b.htm. Retrieved 23 March 2010.
  2. 2.0 2.1  James J. Walsh (1913). "Louis Pasteur". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.