MOBO Awards

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The MOBO (an acronym for Music of Black Origin) Awards are held annually in the UK to recognise leading black musicians.

The ninth annual MOBO Awards ceremony took place on 30 September 2004 at the Royal Albert Hall in London and was broadcast on BBC television. Controversy surrounded the removal of reggae artists Vybz Kartel and Elephant Man from the "Best Reggae Act" category at the 2004 awards due to their homophobic lyrics.

In 2009, the award ceremony was held in Glasgow for the first time. Before that, it had been held in London. In 2011, the ceremony returned to Scotland for a second time.

Awards[change | change source]

The Music Of Black Origin (MOBO) Awards were established in 1996 by Kanya King and Andy Ruffell to recognize and celebrate artists who create "black" or "urban" music. The MOBOs may be the most prestigious, but they were not the first bnlack music awards show in Europe. In Britain, the Black Music Awards (BMA) show ran from 1992 to 1996 at various venues in London.[1][2] For non-music shows, the Afro Hair and Beauty show was set up by Dyke and Dryden beauty company in 1982,[3] and is still an annual event in London.

The first MOBO award was presented to UK trio Baby D, in the Best Dance Act category.[4] The MOBO Awards are seen as a UK equivalent to the BET Awards and Soul Train Awards for being the main award show in Britain to focus on Urban music.

References[change | change source]

  1. Kwaku (15 Jan 1994). "U.K. Black Music Awards Gain Industry's Respect In 2nd Year". Billboard. p. 34. Retrieved May 17, 2013. {{cite web}}: Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  2. Kwaku, Kwaku (10 December 1994). "Wayne Marshall, Don Campbell Top Winners At U.K.'s BMAs". Billboard. p. 52. Retrieved 17 May 2013. {{cite web}}: Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  3. "Hair Events What to expect from the Afro Hair & Beauty Show 2012?". http://cefac.co.uk. Archived from the original on 23 March 2016. Retrieved 17 May 2013. {{cite web}}: External link in |publisher= (help)
  4. 1996 Mobo Awards.