Mycoplasma amphoriforme

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Mycoplasma amphoriforme
Scientific classification
Domain: Bacteria
Phylum: Firmicutes
Class: Mollicutes
Order: Mycoplasmatales
Family: Mycoplasmataceae
Genus: Mycoplasma
Species: M. amphoriforme
Binomial name
Mycoplasma amphoriforme

Pitcher et al. 2005

Mycoplasma amphoriforme is a type of bacteria. It belongs in a larger group Mycoplasma. This group of bacteria do not have a cell like other bacteria.[1] Because this bacteria does not have a cell wall medicines may not cure an infection with this bacteria. Penicillin and other medications cannot cure this infection. There are other medications that will work. This group of bacteria are the smallest ones discovered.[2] These bacteria do not need oxygen.

This bacterium has been found in people who are sick. Some people who have lung infections and can not fight illnesses have an infection with this bacterium.[3][4] It moves by gliding and has a pointed tip that looks the same as M. gallepticum, and M. pneumonia. If a person has an infection with this bacterium they might breathe fast and their hearts could beat fast.[5]

References[change | change source]

  1. Ryan KJ, Ray CG (editors) (2004). Sherris Medical Microbiology (4th ed.). McGraw Hill. pp. 409–12. ISBN 0-8385-8529-9.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  2. Richard L. Sweet; Ronald S. Gibbs. Infectious Diseases of the Female Genital Tract. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009.
  3. Hatchel, J. M. (2006). "Ultrastructure and gliding motility of Mycoplasma amphoriforme, a possible human respiratory pathogen". Microbiology. 152 (7): 2181–2189. doi:10.1099/mic.0.28905-0. ISSN 1350-0872. PMID 16804191.
  4. "Ureaplasma Infection: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology". 24 October 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2017 – via eMedicine. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  5. Ling, C. L.; Oravcova, K.; Beattie, T. F.; Creer, D. D.; Dilworth, P.; Fulton, N. L.; Hardie, A.; Munro, M.; Pond, M. (2014). "Tools for Detection of Mycoplasma amphoriforme: a Primary Respiratory Pathogen?". Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 52 (4): 1177–1181. doi:10.1128/JCM.03049-13. ISSN 0095-1137. PMC 3993489. PMID 24478412.