Oak

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Oaks
Foliage and acorns of Quercus robur
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Fagales
Family: Fagaceae
Genus: Quercus
L.

The oak tree is a kind of hardwood forest tree. Oak trees come in many different kinds of species, but all of them have large seeds called acorns. There are over 300 varieties of oak trees.[1]

Oak trees grow in many parts of Europe and North America. Many people who own wooded land in these parts of the world are proud of their oak trees. Oak is a climax vegetation in much of the Northern Hemisphere. What that means is, left untouched by humans, it would be the dominant tree. Much of England was covered by oak forests before modern farming took over the land. The last extensive oak woodlands were cut down to build ships for the Royal Navy in the 18th century.

Some kinds of oak wood are very hard. A lot of furniture was made from oak wood, but the wood is now scarce and expensive. Much cheaper are softwoods like pine.

Most oak trees lose all of their leaves in autumn. Some kinds of oak tree, the "live oak", that grows in the American South or the Holm oak[2] that grows in Europe keep their leaves through winter It is called the "live oak" in the United States of America because it keeps many of its leaves during winter.

Oak trees can live up to 1000 years. [3]

Acorns[change | edit source]

Main article:Acorn

Oak trees can start producing acorns when they are roughly 20 years old. However they may reach 50 years before the first production. When the tree is between 70 and 80 years old it produces thousands of acorns.[4]

Oak trees produce acorns once a year which ripen in Autumn. The production changes every year. Not even the healthiest and largest oak have enough energy to produce a lot of them two years in succession.[source?]

Images[change | edit source]

References[change | edit source]