Piranha

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Piranha
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Characiformes
Family: Serrasalmidae
Géry, 1972
Genera

Catoprion
Pristobrycon
Pygocentrus
Pygopristis
Serrasalmus

The piranha (also known as the caribe) is a ferocious, schooling, fresh-water fish. It is native to warm lowland streams and lakes in South America, east of the Andes Mountains. Piranhas have been introduced to other places, including Northern Brazil, Hawaii, and parts of Central and North America. There are many species of piranha; they belong to the genera Pygocentrus and Serrasalmus. They reproduce by laying eggs.

Diet[change | edit source]

Piranhas are opportunistic carnivores (flesh-eaters). They eat aquatic and land animals that are in the water. Some of the prey includes fish, mollusks, crustaceans, insects, birds, lizards, amphibians, rodents, and carrion (dead meat that they find). These fish are diurnal (most active during the day).

Predators[change | edit source]

Many animals prey upon piranhas (especially young piranhas), including other piranhas, caimans, water snakes, turtles, birds, otters, and people.