Pomona College

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Pomona College
Crookshank Hall.jpg
TypePrivate liberal arts college
EstablishedOctober 14, 1887 (1887-10-14)
Endowment$2.325 billion (2019)[1]
Budget$229 million (2020)[2]
PresidentG. Gabrielle Starr[3]
Academic staff
250[4]
Administrative staff
271[5]
Undergraduates1,671[6]
Location, ,
United States
CampusSuburban, 140 acres[7]
ColorsBlue and gold[8]
         
NicknameSagehens
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division IIISCIAC
MascotCecil the Sagehen
Websitewww.pomona.edu
Pomona College logo.svg

Pomona College is a private liberal arts college in Claremont, California. It was founded in 1887 by a group of Congregationalists[9] who wanted to make a "college of the New England type" in Southern California, and in the 1920s, it founded the Claremont Colleges group.

Pomona is a four-year college for undergraduates. About 1,700 students from all 50 U.S. states and 63 countries go there as of 2020.[10] The college offers 48 majors and 600 courses, but students can take about 2700 courses total when the courses at the other Claremont Colleges are counted.[11] The college's 140-acre main campus is in a residential area near the base of the San Gabriel Mountains.[7]

Pomona has the lowest acceptance rate of any U.S. liberal arts college[12][13] (7.4% for the class of 2024[14]), and is ranked among the top five liberal arts colleges in the country by Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, and The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education.[15][16][17] It has an endowment of $2.33 billion as of 2019,[1] giving it the eighth-highest endowment per student of any college or university in the U.S.[18][19] In 2020, Niche ranked Pomona as the most diverse college or university in the country;[20] 74% of students are from outside of California, 56% receive need-based financial aid, and 61% are a person of color or an international student.[21][22][23][24] The college is a top contributor to the Fulbright Program and other competitive fellowships.[25][26][27][28]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year (FY) 2019 Endowment Market Valueand Change* in Endowment Market Value from FY18 to FY19". National Association of College and University Business Officers. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  2. "Who goes to Pomona?". Pomona College. Retrieved 13 August 2020.
  3. "Pomona's 10th President - G. Gabrielle Starr". Pomona College. Archived from the original on 29 December 2016.
  4. "Common Data Set 2019-2020". Pomona College. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  5. John Evan Seery. "Somewhere Between a Jeremiad and a Eulogy". Archived from the original on 26 September 2018. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  6. "Fact Sheet". Pomona College. Archived from the original on 30 June 2020. Retrieved 31 July 2020.
  7. 7.0 7.1 "Life at Pomona". Pomona College. Retrieved 7 April 2020.
  8. "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on December 22, 2015. Retrieved November 22, 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. "1885 | Pomona College Timeline". Pomona College. Archived from the original on August 29, 2019. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  10. "Admissions and Aid". Pomona College. February 3, 2015. Archived from the original on August 31, 2017. Retrieved January 26, 2018.
  11. "Fast Facts". Pomona College. May 21, 2015. Archived from the original on February 28, 2017. Retrieved February 27, 2017.
  12. "Top 100 - Lowest Acceptance Rates". U.S. News. Archived from the original on February 23, 2017. Retrieved 7 October 2018.
  13. "CDS 2018-2019". Pomona College.
  14. "Common Data Set 2019-2020". Pomona College.
  15. "National Liberal Arts Colleges Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Archived from the original on August 21, 2016. Retrieved September 17, 2018.
  16. "America's Top Colleges List". Forbes. Archived from the original on August 10, 2016. Retrieved August 2, 2017.
  17. "Explore the Full WSJ/THE College Rankings". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on October 6, 2018. Retrieved 6 October 2018.
  18. "Introducing the Pomona College Class of 2022". Pomona College. March 15, 2018. Archived from the original on March 17, 2018. Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  19. "Endowment per Student". College Raptor. Archived from the original on July 4, 2019. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  20. "2020 Most Diverse Colleges in America". Niche. Archived from the original on May 27, 2020. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  21. "Pomona College Profile 2016–2017" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on August 3, 2017. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  22. "Common Data Set 2016–2017" (PDF). Pomona College. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 20, 2016. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  23. "Pomona College Enrollment Statistics – Fall 2017" (PDF). Pomona College. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 16, 2017. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  24. "Student Body- Fall 2018". Pomona College. April 7, 2015. Archived from the original on October 6, 2018. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  25. "Home | The Rhodes Scholarships". The Rhodes Trust. Archived from the original on May 23, 2013. Retrieved October 26, 2017.
  26. "Marshall Scholarships Statistics". Marshall Scholarships. Archived from the original on January 26, 2017. Retrieved September 16, 2017.
  27. "Meet the Fellows". Thomas J. Watson Foundation. Archived from the original on October 2, 2017. Retrieved October 26, 2017.
  28. "Top Producers of Fulbright U.S. Scholars and Students, 2018-19". The Chronicle of Higher Education. February 10, 2019. Archived from the original on April 14, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2019.