Rosehill Cemetery

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The entrance of Rosehill

Rosehill Cemetery, was founded in 1864, is an American cemetery on the North Side of Chicago, Illinois, and at 350 acres (1.4 km2), is the largest cemetery in the City of Chicago. The name "Rosehill" came from a City Clerk's error – the area was previously called "Roe's Hill".[1] It is located in the north east section of the Lincoln Square community area.

The Rosehill Cemetery Administration Building and Entry Gate was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1975.

Like its sister cemetery Graceland, Rosehill is the burial place of many well-known Chicagoans. The cemetery contains many monuments that are notable for their beauty and eccentricity, such as that of Lulu Fellows.[2]

Many famous Chicagoans are buried here such as: Lester L. Bond, Levi Boone, Jack Brickhouse, Harvey Doolittle Colvin, DeWitt Clinton Cregier, Charles G. Dawes, Robert Franks, Augustus Garrett, John Charles Haines, Alexander Loyd, Roswell B. Mason, Isaac Lawrence Milliken, Buckner Stith Morris, Richard B. Ogilvie, John Blake Rice, John A. Roche, Richard Warren Sears, John G. Shedd, William Stratton, George Bell Swift, Aaron Montgomery Ward, and John Wentworth.

References[change | change source]

  1. "Revisiting Roe's Hill and Our Shoreline". edgewaterhistory.org.
  2. Matt Hucke (2010). "Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum: Lulu Fellows". Graveyards.com. Retrieved 2015-08-25.