Sam Gyimah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Sam Gyimah

Official portrait of Mr Sam Gyimah crop 2.jpg
Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation
In office
9 January 2018 – 30 November 2018
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded byJo Johnson
Succeeded byChris Skidmore
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Prisons and Probation
In office
17 July 2016 – 9 January 2018
Prime MinisterTheresa May
Preceded byAndrew Selous
Succeeded byRory Stewart
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Childcare and Education
In office
21 July 2014 – 17 July 2016
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byElizabeth Truss
Succeeded byCaroline Dinenage
Minister for the Constitution
In office
14 July 2014 – 12 May 2015
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byGreg Clark
Succeeded byJohn Penrose
Lord Commissioner of the Treasury
In office
7 October 2013 – 14 July 2014
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byDesmond Swayne
Succeeded byHarriett Baldwin
Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Prime Minister
In office
4 September 2012 – 7 October 2013
Prime MinisterDavid Cameron
Preceded byDesmond Swayne
Succeeded byGavin Williamson
Member of Parliament
for East Surrey
Assumed office
6 May 2010
Preceded byPeter Ainsworth
Majority23,914 (40.4%)
Personal details
Born
Samuel Phillip Gyimah

(1976-08-10) 10 August 1976 (age 43)
Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England
Political partyConservative
Spouse(s)
Nicky Black (m. 2012)
Children2
Alma materSomerville College, Oxford
WebsiteOfficial website

Samuel Phillip Gyimah ( /ˈmɑː/; born 10 August 1976)[1] is a Conservative politician. He has been the Member of Parliament (MP) for East Surrey since the 2010 general election.[2]

Between 2014 and 2018, he was the Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Prime Minister David Cameron and a government whip.[3][4][5] Gyimah was the Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation from January 2018 until he resigned on 30 November 2018.[6]

On 1 June 2019, Gyimah announced his plans to run for Leader of the Conservative Party in the 2019 election.[7] But on 10 June, he withdrew from the race.[8]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Sam's Background". Sam Gyimah. Archived from the original on 11 January 2014. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  2. "Sam in Parliament". Sam Gyimah. Archived from the original on 12 June 2014. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  3. "Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Childcare and Education". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  4. "Parliamentary Secretary (Minister for the Constitution)". www.gov.uk. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  5. "Her Majesty's Government: December 2015". Prime Minister's Office. 12 May 2015. Retrieved 20 July 2016.
  6. Tominey, Camilla (30 November 2018). "Tory minister Sam Gyimah resigns in protest at Theresa May's withdrawal deal". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 30 November 2018.
  7. "Gyimah announces Tory leadership bid". BBC News. 2 June 2019. Retrieved 2 June 2019.
  8. MP, Sam Gyimah (2019-06-10). "My statement on the Conservative Party leadership contest.pic.twitter.com/Fm5sE4h7TI". @SamGyimah. Retrieved 2019-06-10.