Secularism

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Allegory of the French Law of Separation of Church and State (1905)

Secularism, also called Secularity or is the idea of something being not religious or not connected to a church. An example of this is the government, which is independent of any religion in many states. In some countries, such as Pakistan, Iran or Saudi Arabia, there is a state religion. In that case, the government follows the state religion. In contrast, India and United States had founding fathers who made a law that religion and government should stay separate. This means that anyone can choose to practice or not practice any religion they want, and the government cannot make them be a part of a religion if they do not want to.

In a theocracy the priests of religion are the rulers of the country.

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