Strong acid

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In chemistry, a strong acid is an acid which ionizes (splits) completely in a solution of water. It always loses a proton (A H+) when put in water. A weak acid does not always lose a proton, though; It can lose its proton, but not all the time[source?] They also have a very low pH, usually between 1 and 3. Many strong acids have a negative pKa value, which means they are very strong.

The six common strong acids are: (Acronym:CBSPIN)

  1. HydroChloric acid HCl
  2. HydroBromic acid HBr
  3. Sulfuric acid H₂SO₄
  4. Perchloric acid HClO4
  5. HydroIodic acid HI
  6. Nitric acid HNO3

Almost strong acids include:

  1. Chloric acid HClO3