Syriac language

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Syriac
ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐLeššānā Suryāyā
Syriac - Estrangelo Nisibin Calligraphy.png
Leššānā Suryāyā in written Syriac (Esṭrangelā script)
Pronunciationlɛʃʃɑːnɑː surjɑːjɑː
RegionUpper Mesopotamia, Eastern Arabia
Era1st century AD; Dramatically declined as a vernacular language after the 14th century; Developed into Northeastern Neo-Aramaic and Central Neo-Aramaic languages after the 12th century.[1]
Syriac abjad
Language codes
ISO 639-2syc Classical Syriac
ISO 639-3syc Classical Syriac
Glottologclas1252[2]
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This article contains Syriac text, written from right to left in a cursive style with some letters joined. Without proper rendering support, you may see unjoined Syriac letters or other symbols instead of Syriac script.

Syriac (ܠܫܢܐ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ leššānā Suryāyā) is an Eastern Aramaic language. It was spoken long ago in the Fertile Crescent. Most of the Aramaic writing that survives from the second to the eighth century AD is Syriac.

Other websites[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Angold 2006, pp. 391
  2. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Classical Syriac". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.