The Bourne Identity

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The Bourne Identity is an action-thriller movie released in 2002. It is based on the novel by Robert Ludlum, The Bourne Identity, which was published in 1980. The movie is directed by Doug Liman. It stars Matt Damon as the main character, Jason Bourne.

In the movie, as Jason Bourne recovers from his gunshot wound, he find that he lost his memory. As he recovered his memory, he learns he was involved with an international spy agency. The movie is set in Europe, in places such as Prague, Paris, and Italy. It shows thrilling gunfights, car chases, and action scenes. After release, the box-office profit was successful. Two sequels, The Bourne Supremacy and The Bourne Ultimatum were released in 2004 and 2007.

Plot[change | change source]

An unidentified man is rescued from the sea by fishermen. But because of amnesia, he cannot remember who he is. He cannot remember why he was drowning in the sea, how the gunshot wound on his back was made, how he can speak many languages or how he has martial arts skills. He only knows the number to his Swiss bank safe which was hidden in his skin.

In the safe, he finds a huge amount of cash, and passports for each country. He saw the name "Jason Bourne" on his U.S. passport and he believes that is his name. After he has some trouble at the U.S. embassy in Zurich, he moves to Paris with the help of a woman named Marie Kreutz. Wherever he moves, the police and assassins chase him and Marie. In continuous chasing between Bourne and the killers, he notices that some unknown big power threatens his existence. To find his identity and the reason why they are trying to kill him, Bourne gradually gains access to the unknown agency.

Release Dates[change | change source]

Country Premiere
 United States 14 June 2002
 Australia 22 August 2002
 Taiwan 23 August 2002
 Philippines 4 September 2002
 United Kingdom 6 September 2002
 Ireland 6 September 2002
 Lebanon 12 September 2002
 Singapore 12 September 2002
 Denmark 13 September 2002
 Norway 13 September 2002
 New Zealand 16 September 2002
 Hong Kong 19 September 2002
 Malaysia 19 September 2002
 Iceland 20 September 2002
 Turkey 20 September 2002
 Belgium 25 September 2002
 Egypt 25 September 2002
 France 25 September 2002
 Indonesia 25 September 2002
 Venezuela 25 September 2002
 Austria 26 September 2002
 Switzerland 26 September 2002 (German speaking region)
 Germany 26 September 2002
 Poland 27 September 2002
 Argentina 3 October 2002
 Chile 3 October 2002
 Colombia 3 October 2002
 Cyprus 4 October 2002
 Estonia 4 October 2002
 India 4 October 2002
 Kazakhstan 4 October 2002
 Thailand 4 October 2002
 Ukraine 4 October 2002
 Peru 10 October 2002
 Russia 10 October 2002
 Slovenia 10 October 2002
 Brazil 11 October 2002
 Finland 11 October 2002
 Kenya 11 October 2002
 Portugal 11 October 2002
 Czech Republic 17 October 2002
 Hungary 17 October 2002
 Israel 17 October 2002
 Netherlands 17 October 2002
 South Korea 18 October 2002
 Mexico 18 October 2002
 Sweden 18 October 2002
 Kuwait 22 October 2002
 Bulgaria 25 October 2002
 South Africa 25 October 2002
 Croatia 7 November 2002
 Spain 8 November 2002
 Italy 15 November 2002
 Uruguay 15 November 2002
 China 21 November 2002
 Greece 22 November 2002
 Romania 22 November 2002
 Lithuania 10 January 2003
 Japan 25 January 2003

Critics[change | change source]

After the movie was released in the U.S., the movie got generally good reviews from several critics, especially for the acting of Matt Damon and the direction of Doug Liman. Peter Howell of the Toronto Star said, "An entertaining thriller that eschews most of the usual spy gimmicks in favour of old-fashioned sleuthing."[1] Eric Harrison of the Houston Chronicle praised the direction of Liman: "The Bourne Identity shouldn’t be half as entertaining as it is, but director Doug Liman and his colleagues have managed to pack it with enough action to satisfy the boom-bam crowd without a huge sacrifice of character and mood."[2] Matt Damon also got praise from Stephen Hunter of the Washington Post: "Great fights. You wouldn’t think of Damon as a tough guy, but he’s worked really hard on the physical stuff here and it shows."[3]

References[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]