Tubo

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Tubo (吐蕃、大蕃国)

བོད་ཆེན་པོ།
Bod chen po
618–842
[source?]
Flag of Tibet[source?]
Map of the Tibetan empire at its greatest extent between the 780s and the 790s
Map of the Tibetan empire at its greatest extent between the 780s and the 790s
CapitalLhasa
Common languagesTibetan language
Religion
Tibetan Buddhism, Bön
GovernmentMonarchy
Tsenpo (Emperor) 
• 618–650
Songtsen Gampo (first)
• 756–797
Trisong Detsen
• 815–838
Ralpacan
• 838–842
Langdarma (last)
Lönchen (Chief Minister) 
• 652–667
Gar Tongtsen Yülsung
• 685–699
Gar Trinring Tsendro
• 782?–783
Nganlam Takdra Lukhong
• 783–796
Nanam Shang Gyaltsen Lhanang
Banchenpo (Chief Monk) 
• 798–?
Nyang Tingngezin Sangpo (first)
• ?–838
Dranga Palkye Yongten (last)
History 
• Founded by Emperor Songtsen Gampo
618
• Death of Langdarma
842
Area
800 est.[1][2]4,600,000 km2 (1,800,000 sq mi)
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Zhangzhung
Era of Fragmentation
Guiyi Circuit
Qocho
Today part ofChina
India
Nepal
Pakistan

Tubo (Chinese: 吐蕃;, Tibetan: བོད་ཆེན་པོ, bod chen po), also called the Tibetan Empire, existed from the 7th to 9th centuries. Its first king was Songtsen Gampo. Its second king was Mangsong Mangzan. It controlled the Tibetan Plateau as well as parts of Central Asia and South Asia. They came after the Zhangzhung people, who practiced the Bon religion. The Tibet empire imported Buddhism from China and India, combined it with the native Bon religion, and created Tibetan Buddhism. Gampo also helped invent the Tibetan alphabet during this time.

Sources[change | change source]