Book of Jonah

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Old Testament (Tanakh)

Old Testament Books of the Old Agreement common to all Christians and Jews)

Additional Books (common to Catholics and Orthodox)

Greek & Slavonic Orthodox

Georgian Orthodox


The Old Testament book of Jonah, contains four chapters, and forty-eight verses. The book tells the story of the Prophet Jonah, who was called by God to the heathen city of Nineveh, which God would soon destroy if they did not repent. After his first rejection, Jonah was swallowed by a great fish (probably a whale). He repented of his sin of running away from God through prayer for three days and nights. God then made the great fish spit Jonah onto the dry land. He obeyed God and went to tell the people of their sins to God.

They nearly had him killed. But that was before their hearts were changed and they saw their evildoing. They prayed for God to deliver them from the upcoming destruction to their city. God saw their change and had mercy on them, but Jonah still did not believe it. He would than wait upon a high up rock and await God's wrath. God was not pleased with that and sent a small worm to bite down the small gourd plant, which was Jonah's only shade from the heat of the sun. He was very angry and said it was better for him to die than live. God, in turn, said that he cared more about the little plant than all the people of Nineveh!

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