Brick

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
A wall made from bricks

A brick is a man-made building material used to make walls and make places to walk.

Bricks are made of clay. Bricks are either formed into molds or cut with wires, and then baked in an oven. The color of a brick depends on the color of the clay from which it was made.

Masons build brick walls. They join bricks together using mortar.

Bricks can be assembled into many different patterns. The most common pattern is called "running bond". A row of bricks is called a course. A wall that is just one brick thick has one wythe.

Bricks used outdoors on the ground are called "pavers".

History[change | change source]

The oldest shaped bricks found date back to 7,500 B.C. They have been found in Çayönü, a place located in the upper Tigris area in south east Anatolia close to Diyarbakir. Newer bricks, dated between 7,000 and 6,395 B.C., come from Jericho and Catal Hüyük. The inven­tion of the fired brick (as opposed to the consid­erably earlier sun-dried mud brick) is believed to have arisen in about the third millennium BC in the Middle East. Fired bricks were much more resistant to cold and moist weather conditions. Fired bricks enabled the construction of permanent buildings in regions where the harsher climate precluded the use of mud bricks.

Other images[change | change source]