Fibonacci

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Statue of Fibonacci by Giovanni Paganucci in the Camposanto di Pisa, 1863

Leonardo Pisano Bigollo (c. 1170-1250), also known as Fibonacci,[1] was an Italian mathematician during the Middle Ages.[2]

Fibonacci number sequence[change | edit source]

Fibbonacci is best known for the list of numbers called the Fibonacci Sequence. The list never stops, but it starts this way:

1,  1,  2,  3,  5,  8,  13,  21,  34,  55,  89, 144, ...

In this list, a person can find the next number by adding the last two numbers together.

1 + 1 = 2
    1 + 2 = 3
        2 + 3 = 5
            3 + 5 = 8
                5 + 8 = 13
                    8 + 13 = 21
                        13 + 21 = 34
                             21 + 34 = 55
                                  34 + 55 = 89
                                       55 + 89 = 144
                                            89 + 144 = 233
                                                 144 + 233 = 377
                                                       233 + 377 = 610
                                                             377 + 610 = 987
                                                                   610 + 987 = 1597
                                                                         987 + 1597 = 2584
                                                                         etc...

This series is also interesting because the ratio of two adjacent numbers in the series approaches the golden ratio.[3]

References[change | edit source]

  1. This mathematician is also known as Leonardo Pisano, Leonardo Bonacci, Leonardo Fibonacci and Leonardo of Pisa.
  2. "The Fibonacci Series - Biographies - Leonardo Fibonacci (ca.1175 - ca.1240)". Library.thinkquest.org. http://library.thinkquest.org/27890/biographies1.html. Retrieved 2010-08-02.
  3. Livio, Mario. (2003). The Golden Ratio: The Story of Phi, the World's Most Astonishing Number, pp. 96-97.