Gravitational wave

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General relativity
G_{\mu \nu} + \Lambda g_{\mu \nu}= {8\pi G\over c^4} T_{\mu \nu}
Einstein field equations
Phenomena
Kepler problem · Lenses · Waves
Frame-dragging · Geodetic effect
Event horizon · Singularity
Black hole
Do not confuse with gravity wave

Gravitational waves are ripples in spacetime created by any particle or object with mass. Gravitational waves were predicted by Albert Einstein in 1916 on the basis of his theory of general relativity.[1]

Sources of detectable gravitational waves could possibly include binary star systems composed of white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes. Physicists have not yet found a way to detect them.

Gravity and relativity[change | change source]

In physics, gravitational waves are ripples in the curvature of spacetime that move as a wave, travelling outward from the source. Albert Einstein predicted them in 1915 on the basis of his theory of general relativity.[1][2] In theory, gravitational waves transport energy as gravitational radiation. Sources of detectable gravitational waves might include binary star systems composed of white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes.

In general relativity, gravitational waves cannot travel faster than the speed of light. They do not exist in the Newtonian theory of gravitation, in which physical interactions propagate at infinite speed.

Although gravitational radiation has not been directly detected, there is indirect evidence for its existence. For example, the 1993 Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded for measurements of the Hulse-Taylor binary star system that suggests gravitational waves are more than mathematical anomalies. Various gravitational wave detectors exist. However, they have not yet detected the phenomena.

References[change | change source]