Maui

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Maui is the second largest of the Hawaiian Islands, in the United States. It has a population of just over 100,000 and is 727 square miles (1883 km²) in size. Maui is part of Maui County, Hawaii. The larger (or better known) towns include Kahului, Wailuku, Lahaina, Hana, and Wailea. Main industries are agriculture and tourism.

Maui was named for the demi-god Maui. In Hawaiian legend, he raised all the islands from the sea. Maui is also known as the "Valley Isle" for the large fertile isthmus (narrow land connection) between two volcanoes.

Maui is a volcanic doublet: an island formed from two volcanic mountains that are joined together. The older volcano, Mauna Kahalawai, is much older and has been very worn down. In common talk it is called the West Maui Mountain. The larger volcano, Haleakala, rises above 10,000 feet (3,050 m). The last eruption of Haleakala happened over 200 years ago, and this lava flow can be seen between Ahihi Bay and La Perouse Bay on the southeast shore.

Other places on Maui popular with visitors include:

  • Ī'ao Valley.
  • Haleakala crater
  • Road to Hāna
  • Wai'ānapanapa

Golf courses on Maui include:

  • Grand Waikapu Country Club
  • Ka'anapali Golf Course
  • Kapalua Golf Club
  • Makena Golf Club
  • Maui Country Club
  • Pukalani Country Club
  • Sandalwood Country Club
  • Silversword Golf Course
  • Wai'ehu Municipal Golf Course
  • Wailea Golf Club