Propene

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Propene
Propylene skeletal.svg
Propene-2D-flat.png
Propylene.png
Propylene-3D-balls.png
IUPAC name Propene
Identifiers
CAS number 115-07-1
PubChem 8252
KEGG C11505
ChEBI CHEBI:16052
RTECS number UC6740000
SMILES CC=C
Properties
Molecular formula C3H6
Molar mass 42.08 g mol-1
Appearance Colorless gas
Density 1.81 kg/m3, gas (1.013 bar, 15 °C)
613.9 kg/m3, liquid
Melting point

− 185.2 °C, 88 K, -301 °F

Boiling point

− 47.6 °C, 226 K, -54 °F

Solubility in water 0.61 g/m3
Viscosity 8.34 µPa·s at 16.7 °C
Structure
Dipole moment 0.366 D (gas)
Hazards
MSDS External MSDS
Main hazards Highly flammable,
Asphyxiant
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

4
1
1
 
R-phrases 12
S-phrases 9-16-33
Flash point −108 °C
Related compounds
Related groups Allyl, Propenyl
Related compounds Propane, Propyne
Propadiene, 1-Propanol
2-Propanol
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Propene is an organic compound.The substance is also known as propylene and has the formula C3H6. It is the second-simplest Alkene. Since it is only made of hydrogen and carbon atoms, it is a Hydrocarbon. At room temperature and normal pressure it is a gas.

Uses[change | edit source]

Propene is produced from fossil fuels, and from coal. Propene is the second most important product used in the petrochemical industry, after Ethene. About two thirds are used to produce Polypropylene. Propene and benzene are converted to acetone and phenol via the cumene process. Propene is also used to produce isopropanol (propan-2-ol), acrylonitrile, propylene oxide (epoxypropane) and epichlorohydrin.[1]

References[change | edit source]

  1. Budavari, Susan, ed. (1996). "8034. Propylene". The Merck Index, Twelfth Edition. New Jersey: Merck & Co.. pp. 1348–1349.